What is the Bitcoin Mempool? A Beginner's Explanation ...

<-- Number of people checking the mempool more obsessively than the price right now /r/Bitcoin

<-- Number of people checking the mempool more obsessively than the price right now /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] <-- Number of people checking the mempool more obsessively than the price right now

The following post by Dickydickydomdom is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7m0rcy
The original post's content was as follows:
https://dedi.jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/more/#24h
It's like I'm cheering on a football team! Come on orange band! your time to shine so that stupidly low fee transaction I sent last week can finally confirm!
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

In the latest Bitcoin Fees app update you can now see the unconfirmed mempool transaction count for each fee range. Check it out at BitcoinFeesApp.com

In the latest Bitcoin Fees app update you can now see the unconfirmed mempool transaction count for each fee range. Check it out at BitcoinFeesApp.com submitted by BitcoinFeesApp to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

BCash is proving that increasing the block size just isn't a good solution. Check out their mempool in the last week. /r/Bitcoin

BCash is proving that increasing the block size just isn't a good solution. Check out their mempool in the last week. /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

01-14 19:43 - 'BCash is proving that increasing the block size just isn't a good solution. Check out their mempool in the last week.' (i.redd.it) by /u/SternerCrow removed from /r/Bitcoin within 57-67min

BCash is proving that increasing the block size just isn't a good solution. Check out their mempool in the last week.
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: SternerCrow
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Every bitcoiner, You really need to check the mempool, bitcoin is not usable now

The following post by kepadez is being replicated because the post has been silently greylisted.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7l6j92
The original post's content was as follows:
[removed]
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Most reliable site to check mempool? /r/Bitcoin

Most reliable site to check mempool? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

STOP paying so high fees? Check the Mempool first! /r/Bitcoin

STOP paying so high fees? Check the Mempool first! /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

With the mempool clearing out after a crazy week, check out the Bitcoin Fees app to see how long your transaction will now take to confirm! /r/Bitcoin

With the mempool clearing out after a crazy week, check out the Bitcoin Fees app to see how long your transaction will now take to confirm! /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Advice About Bitcoin Transaction Fees (In anticipation of high fees for the next bullrun)

Hi guys, this is my first post here!
Thanks for having me, I interact a lot on Bitcoin and crypto groups on Facebook but I wanted to find new Bitcoin folks and discussions here!
The other day I saw someone complaining about the wait time for a Bitcoin transaction so I wrote a few pieces of advice in regards to Bitcoin transaction fees. I hope this can be useful for some of you!
Here it is:
For those worried about Bitcoin's high transaction fees and transaction wait times right now, you should brace yourself for the upcoming TRUE Bitcoin Bullrun.
Remember that in 2017, at the peak of the bubble, the average transaction fee was up to $ 50 per transaction and some people even paid $ 1000 for single transactions.
This is sure to repeat itself at an unprecedented level as I believe this time around an even bigger wave of people will be buying Bitcoin. Not only investors like you and me, but also big companies who will buy in tens and hundreds of millions.
Here are some tips to mitigate the impact of transaction fees on your use of Bitcoin.

1. Learn How to Use the Mempool.

The mempool is the space where valid Bitcoin transactions are stored while waiting to be included in a validated Bitcoin block. Obviously, miners will select transactions with higher transaction fees to fill up a valid block.
I recommend this mempool explorer which visually represents how full the mempool is and will indicate to you how many satoshi /vbyte you need to apply on your transaction in order for it to be included in your desired timeframe.
Fee estimators in wallets are not ideal and ultimately none of them has found the perfect recipe for proper fee estimation. Selecting the transaction fee manually by consulting the mempool remains the best option to select the fee.
A few tips:

2. Use wallets that support Segwit and RBF (Replace by Fee)

Segwit is an improvement made to Bitcoin in 2017 that redefined the way transactions take space in a block. Just by using a Bitcoin wallet that supports it, you will save between 20-60% in fees depending on the complexity of the transaction.
RBF is a function in wallets that allows you to modify the transaction fees associated with a transaction following its broadcast on the Bitcoin network. So, if your transaction does not go through quickly enough for your liking, you can increase the fee later.
To find out which Bitcoin software wallet supports both features, you can consult this comparison table from Veriphi where they list several dozen wallets here.
Fun fact:
Veriphi also made a case study to find out how many fees could have been saved by Bitcoin users if they had used SEGWIT and the Batching technique in the cases where they apply.

Results

Between 2012 and August 2020, more than 57,817 .69 BITCOINS would have been saved in transaction costs, or approximately 1 billion Canadian Dollars in transaction fees. For those who are interested in the results, check it out more in detail here.

3. Do not leave your coins on a platform (Bonus: Use a immediate delivery platform)

Custodial exchanges often block Bitcoin withdrawals during high transaction volume episodes because they do not want to pay their user's Bitcoin transaction fees. If they don't block it they will often make their user overpay for the transactions fees.
This has happened in the PAST and even quite recently, so if you want to avoid a lot of the frustration and stress when the Bullrun comes, remove your coins from there before it is too late, preferably right now.
Some non-custodial platform in Canada:
veriphi.io
Bullbitcoin.com
I strongly anticipate the increase in transaction fees. Watch out for platforms that haven't implemented transaction optimization techniques yet, they will have the hardest time sending transactions.
Check out this article about the advantages of an immediate delivery platform here.

Conclusion

High Bitcoin transaction fees are inevitable in Bitcoin and even desired because they will one day have to replace the block rewards. This is a demonstration that Bitcoin works and that the world is using it.
By adopting the best practices and the right technologies, you will be able to mitigate your costs and accumulate more Bitcoin in the end.

*Disclaimer: I work at Veriphi.io but didn't want to be too pushy, I hope you appreciate the tips and the provided resources.
Cheers
submitted by SnooSquirrels7507 to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Running My Own Tor Bitcoin Lightning Node

I've been using my own bitcoin lightning/full node for about a month now and would like to share my findings as well as ask a few questions to the community.
For those that might be curious as to my setup, I am using a Lenovo M900 ThinkCentre with a 1 TB Samsung SSD and 32GB of ram. I'm actually running several VM's on it, for different reasons. One of which is the full Bitcoin/lightning node using Ubuntu Desktop in which I dedicate 8 GB to (more than enough) and most of my disk space to. I wanted a power efficient setup so that I could keep it running 24/7 and this is about as good as it gets short of a Raspberry Pi. When I only have my Bitcoin VM running, I'm consuming ~10 Watts. With everything else running it's ~30 Watts. I bought all of the equipment used (apart from the ram) so it was very cost effective.
What I've learned in my experience:
Questions:
Any info would be appreciated. If anybody has any question that they would like to ask me, feel free to ask!
submitted by Dockin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Are the fees always this high or is it because of my wallet ?

Hello !
So i'm starting to use bitcoin instead of paypal for my paiements and so far it's good.
I have a Bitcoin.com wallet on my android phone and I'm using it for my transactions, but one problem that will certainly make me go back to paypal are the high fees...
How come when I send 5$ using paypal I only pay 0.41$ as fee, but when I send 5$ using bitcoin I pay 3.92$ as a fee , I must be doing something wrong !
Are the fees differ from a wallet to another or are they the same everytwhere ? If I make my own wallet on my laptop for exemple using electrum or any other wallet, will I be paying less fees ? Thank you !
submitted by NoLynxx to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

How does bitcoin scale in performance? (CPU and RAM usage, usually ppl talk about disk space)

I am currently reading "Mastering Bitcoin" and I learned a lot of news things. But a questions keeps bugging me:
If bitcoin grows around 1 terabyte each decade (i know, this is not yet the case), that is completely fine. But the fullnodes store the whole history and validate against the whole past, right? Also wallets, that "restore from a private key" (you setup a new wallet with an old private key, so it has to check the full bitcoin history for your funds).
Won't those be extremely slow mechanisms in the future? What is bearable now, will it be super cpu-intensive in several years? The mempool takes unconfirmed transactions, but in the end, it only "accepts" them, if they are valid. So the node has to validate all of them right? The longer the chain, the longer that takes, right? (not sure if a node really validates all of them, or if he just validates the block that a miner delivers. I read conflicting information on this topic or misinterpreted one.)
Disclaimer: I could be wrong on some things, please go easy on me. :)
submitted by TrudleR to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

12 hours, Seen by 30 peers, Zero confirmations

BISQ is telling me I have a transaction that has been seen by 30 peers, but has no confirmations. The transaction is almost 12 hours old. Other transactions I made around the same time have all gone through just fine.
I have checked the transaction ID on blockchain.com, and the transaction shows up, but under the line "Included in Block" it just says MEMPOOL instead of giving the Block number like a transaction that has gone through would do.
Anyone have any insight as to what might be causing this, or what might happen to the transaction and the bitcoin at this point?
Thanks for any insight.
submitted by maxfuturecoffee to bisq [link] [comments]

Transaction

I’m just wondering this assuming I own a hardware wallet (ledger per say) if I were to send a transaction of 1 btc to a different address while it’s being confirmed do I still technically have that bitcoin? If not where is it? Cause it’s not at the other persons wallet yet?. Assuming my knowledge is correct, you just shared the control of a specific bit of satoshis. So that means I own it until transaction is verified?
submitted by justinCrypto to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin went slow :( !

Bitcoin is stupid slow at the moment. Too many many folks are using it leading to many transactions waiting to be confirmed. You can check the status of the Bitcoin mempool at https://www.blockchain.com/charts/mempool-size once it goes down your transaction should confirm, normally that how it works.
submitted by Leading_Donkey8586 to TomAndJerryMarket [link] [comments]

Anyone have btc transaction unconfirmed for 8hrs+ today?

submitted by reddit-ate to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Keep in mind you can save transaction fees

Transaction costs are very volatile and often, you don't need to set a high fee or you can just wait a few hours to send it. Many sites are not very accurate, but here's one that could be extremely useful to check before you sent a transaction:
https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,2h
It will show the state of Bitcoin's Mempool (all transactions waiting for confirmation and their fees in Satoshi / byte).
Just move your mouse over the last graph and see how much Satoshi / byte you have to pay that your tx will be included into one of the next blocks.
When you are using a good wallet like Electrum you can change fees. Exchanges won't allow changing fees ofcourse.
submitted by bananaunana to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Error starting up new Bitcoin Unlimited BCH node.

EDIT: Fixed, I just needed to run "./bch-unlimited-1.8.0.0/bin/bitcoind --daemon -reindex" It's fully synced now.
It was syncing for awhile at first but now it keeps crashing whenever I run the following command."./bch-unlimited-1.8.0.0/bin/bitcoind --daemon"
It throws the error "Error: Failed to connect best block"Below is the log. Any help is appreciated.
2020-07-29 18:53:36 CDBEnv::Open: LogDir=/root/.bitcoin/database ErrorFile=/root/.bitcoin/db.log 2020-07-29 18:53:36 Cache configuration: 2020-07-29 18:53:36 * Using 0.0MiB for block database 2020-07-29 18:53:36 * Using 0.0MiB for block undo database 2020-07-29 18:53:36 * Using 2.0MiB for block index database 2020-07-29 18:53:36 * Using 0.0MiB for txindex database 2020-07-29 18:53:36 * Using 317.1MiB for chain state database 2020-07-29 18:53:36 * Using 2155.9MiB for in-memory UTXO set 2020-07-29 18:53:36 init message: Opening Block database... 2020-07-29 18:53:36 LevelDB using max_open_files=1000 (default=1000) 2020-07-29 18:53:36 Opening LevelDB in /root/.bitcoin/blocks/index 2020-07-29 18:53:37 Opened LevelDB successfully 2020-07-29 18:53:37 Using obfuscation key for /root/.bitcoin/blocks/index: 0000000000000000 2020-07-29 18:53:37 init message: Opening UTXO database... 2020-07-29 18:53:37 LevelDB using max_open_files=1000 (default=1000) 2020-07-29 18:53:37 Opening LevelDB in /root/.bitcoin/chainstate 2020-07-29 18:53:38 Opened LevelDB successfully 2020-07-29 18:53:38 Using obfuscation key for /root/.bitcoin/chainstate: 8e46379444ba7f52 2020-07-29 18:53:38 init message: Opening Coins Cache database... 2020-07-29 18:53:38 init message: Loading block index... 2020-07-29 18:53:44 Checking all blk files are present... 2020-07-29 18:53:44 LoadBlockIndexDB: last block file = 695 2020-07-29 18:53:44 LoadBlockIndexDB: last block file info: CBlockFileInfo(blocks=119, size=103373591, heights=441306...441426, time=2016-11-30...2016-12-01) 2020-07-29 18:53:44 LoadBlockIndexDB: hashBestChain=000000000000000000c687014d1c6b88d26a2af658fea4598bbf9d36ae5a987c height=439622 date=2016-11-19 07:15:45 progress=0.268064 2020-07-29 18:53:44 init message: Verifying blocks... 2020-07-29 18:53:44 Verifying last 6 blocks at level 3 2020-07-29 18:53:45 No coin database inconsistencies in last 7 blocks (16216 transactions) 2020-07-29 18:53:45 block index 8915ms 2020-07-29 18:53:45 init message: Loading wallet... 2020-07-29 18:53:45 nFileVersion = 1080000 2020-07-29 18:53:45 Keys: 103 plaintext, 0 encrypted, 103 w/ metadata, 103 total 2020-07-29 18:53:45 wallet 5ms 2020-07-29 18:53:45 init message: Activating best chain... 2020-07-29 18:53:45 ERROR: ConnectBlockDependencyOrdering: block 0000000000000000012ecb0a0b8f28ee434841410d0c04ae14faa20cb5102635 inputs missing/spent in tx 335 0a01201f6cff4d38207d118c9f6100182d40033ffbcfe6daefbf9669e0f98ace 2020-07-29 18:53:45 InvalidChainFound: invalid block=0000000000000000012ecb0a0b8f28ee434841410d0c04ae14faa20cb5102635 height=439623 log2_work=85.562686 date=2016-11-19 07:25:44 2020-07-29 18:53:45 InvalidChainFound: current best=000000000000000000c687014d1c6b88d26a2af658fea4598bbf9d36ae5a987c height=439622 log2_work=85.562655 date=2016-11-19 07:15:45 2020-07-29 18:53:46 ERROR: ConnectTip(): ConnectBlock 0000000000000000012ecb0a0b8f28ee434841410d0c04ae14faa20cb5102635 failed 2020-07-29 18:53:46 Invalid block due to bad-txns-inputs-missingorspent 2020-07-29 18:53:46 InvalidChainFound: invalid block=0000000000000000012ecb0a0b8f28ee434841410d0c04ae14faa20cb5102635 height=439623 log2_work=85.562686 date=2016-11-19 07:25:44 2020-07-29 18:53:46 InvalidChainFound: current best=000000000000000000c687014d1c6b88d26a2af658fea4598bbf9d36ae5a987c height=439622 log2_work=85.562655 date=2016-11-19 07:15:45 2020-07-29 18:53:46 Chain activation failed, returning to next best choice 2020-07-29 18:53:48 Waiting for genesis block to be imported... 2020-07-29 18:53:48 Imported mempool transactions from disk: 0 successes, 0 expired 2020-07-29 18:53:48 Bound to [::]:8333 2020-07-29 18:53:48 Bound to 0.0.0.0:8333 2020-07-29 18:53:48 Error: Failed to connect best block 2020-07-29 18:53:48 Shutdown: In progress... 2020-07-29 18:53:48 StopNode() 2020-07-29 18:53:49 Dumped mempool: 2e-06s to copy, 0.001151s to dump 
submitted by BowlofFrostedFlakes to btc [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by almkglor [link]
This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given private key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

almkglor your post has been copied because one or more comments in this topic have been removed. This copy will preserve unmoderated topic. If you would like to opt-out, please send a message using [this link].
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submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

Mempool Space - Bitcoin Explorer Visual com Fila de Bloco ... [beta] 24x7 stream. Real time visualization of mempool ... Bitcoin Mempool Cleared! Do you REALLY understand the Bitcoin Mempool? Programmer explains. What is a Mempool? - Blockchain

Mempool, established in November, 2018, is a service provider to handle transactions on the blockchain of Bitcoin SV, the only unchangeable source of truth around the globe. It boasts the right to write assets and operations to blockchain, so as to help enterprises use Bitcoin SV blockchain while not owning BSV. Mempool always holds the faith for the Satoshi Vision described in the original ... We learned about what a mempool is, why blockchain wallets can be so difficult to find, and took some first steps in calculating flows from Bitcoin transactions. From gathering the data, plotting flows over price, and checking completed transactions, Amberdata’s blockchain and market data API’s made gaining visibility into the mempool a breeze. Johoe's Bitcoin Mempool Statistics – – Period: This page displays the number and size of the unconfirmed bitcoin transactions, also known as the transactions in the mempool. It gives a real-time view and shows how the mempool evolves over the time. The transactions are colored by the amount of fee they pay per (virtual) byte. The data is generated from my full node and is updated every ... a mempool visualizer and explorer for Bitcoin. Mempool V1 vs Mempool V2. Mempool V1 features basic mempool visualization, fee estimation, and transaction tracking and can run directly off a Bitcoin Core full node on a Raspberry Pi. Mempool V2 is the fully featured explorer running on mempool.space, but it requires a fully synced electrs backend running on powerful server hardware. Guide to ... What is the Bitcoin Mempool? The memory pool (Mempool) is a collection of unconfirmed transactions that await confirmation by all Bitcoin nodes. Think of it as a waiting area for unconfirmed transactions, and if the network is ever overloaded, the list can be quite long. Once it is confirmed, it is cemented into the blockchain and will remain there as long as the network is alive. A ...

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Mempool Space - Bitcoin Explorer Visual com Fila de Bloco ...

This video will go into more details what a mempool in blockchain actually is. Check stats of the mempool: https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/ https://www.bloc... After more than three months of suffering with high fees on the Bitcoin network, the pool of transactions waiting to be added to the blockchain has effectively been processed. Learn to save money ... Juan, Guy, and Gigi are here to talk about Bitcoin and more. Back in May we experienced major Satoshi coin FUD, a new 365-day moving average ATH, a crowded Mempool, BlockFi's issue, and much more. Share your videos with friends, family, and the world Do you want to get transaction notifications in Slack or Discord? In this demo, explore the Notify API and how to create a new webhook to monitor Bitcoin transactions.

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