Secrets of Bitcoin Mining. From the basics of Bitcoin ...

Ethereum Classic (ETC) Suffers Another 51% Attack

Ethereum Classic (ETC) Suffers Another 51% Attack submitted by Solodeji to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Towards a fast single-threaded CSV parser written in C++17

Link

GitHub: https://github.com/p-ranav/csv2

Introduction/Motivation

  1. I wrote a csv library last year and it turned out like crap.
    • Got some good feedback from Reddit. But, the library was poorly designed, became buggy, and was generally hard to maintain.
  2. I've used fast-cpp-csv-parser in the past. It's great (and fast!) but requires the user to know a lot at compile time, e.g., column_count, column_names etc.
  3. I wanted to see what performance could be achieved by parsing single-threaded and managing internal objects with std::string_view.
It seems to be pretty hard to find benchmarks for (or comparisons between) existing CSV parsers in C++.
I'd love your feedback on this library. Specifically, I'd like to know if the performance measurements (see below) are competitive. Any tips on how to improve ifstream read speeds or tokenization would also be greatly appreciated. Following this blog post by Daniel Lemire, I haven't bothered with mmap.

Highlights

Performance Benchmark

The benchmarks program measures two execution times:

Hardware

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2019) Processor: 2.4 GHz 8-Core Intel Core i9 Memory: 32 GB 2400 MHz DDR4 Operating System: macOS Catalina version 10.15.3 

Results

Dataset File Size Rows Cols M1 M2 Total Time
Denver Crime Data 111 MB 479,100 19 0.166s 0.768s 0.934s
AirBnb Paris Listings 196 MB 141,730 96 0.236s 0.512s 0.749s
2015 Flight Delays and Cancellations 574 MB 5,819,079 31 1.071s 9.316s 10.387s
StackLite: Stack Overflow questions 870 MB 17,203,824 7 2.459s 14.532s 16.991s
Used Cars Dataset 1.4 GB 539,768 25 1.597s 1.999s 3.596s
Title-Based Semantic Subject Indexing 3.7 GB 12,834,026 4 4.869s 10.133s 15.002s
Bitcoin tweets - 16M tweets 4 GB 47,478,748 9 7.431s 10.456s 17.887s
DDoS Balanced Dataset 6.3 GB 12,794,627 85 7.938s 42.951s 50.890s
Seattle Checkouts by Title 7.1 GB 34,892,623 11 11.118s 48.818s 59.937s
SHA-1 password hash dump 11 GB 2,62,974,240 2 32.370s 107.985s 140.356s
DOHUI NOH scaled_data 16 GB 504,779 3213 21.121s 59.328s 80.450s
submitted by p_ranav to cpp [link] [comments]

Nothing has changed - what's all the fuss about?

To those BCH holders who see a problem with this development fund - what is so concerning about this that wasn't already true of Bitcoin Cash, the consensus mechanisms it has, and the power of miners? Others have said this before, but if you don't like what 51% hash power is doing, it's an attack. If you do, it's an upgrade. 51% of hash power has always been able to do things like this. This is not new. 51% of the mining power could always censor any transaction. But they won't, because game theory and their economic incentives directs them not to do this. It's the same thing here.
This is basically just a more free market and anarchic way of funding development than what DASH has, where it's built into the rewards system. It's essentially miners donating their rewards to make the ecosystem and coin better, except doing it in a game theoretic fair way that makes sure everyone contributes. And if people in these mining pools don't like it, they can stop offering their hash power, and offer it to someone that opposes it. If there's backlash from the community like that, most likely this proposal won't go through. But I hope it does, and I expect it will, because miners donating millions to BCH is not a good thing. It's a very very good thing.
This makes far more sense than leaving development completely unfunded, and this is more decentralized than both DASH and BTC. This is anarchy in action - development has been agreed to by mining actors rather than the top holders (or those who'm they've hired, i.e. DASH, which I like btw) or outside groups like Blockstream (BTC). Instead, this is the part of our community most invested in seeing Bitcoin Cash succeed. The miners, who have invested millions into mining equipment, probably hold millions in BCH, and are donating millions to see BCH succeed, are not nefarious actors. They're are strongest supporters and investors, and have been screwed over by Blockstream when the Segwit 2X agreement was broken. They need one of the SHA-256 coins to succeed and we all know if won't be Bitcoin BTC. My guess is a much larger portion of the mining power supports BCH than currently mines it - they're just held captive by the current prices of the two currencies.
Complaining about there being only 4 mining companies that agreed to this, and that therefore this is centralized uses the same logic as those who are against ASIC's and support shitcoins like Vertcoin because "muh decentralization." Economics dictates that there are millions of different restaurants, but not nearly as many car companies, nor nearly as many large supply stores like Walmart, Target, or Costco. Decentralization isn't an end in and of itself, but only a good in so far as it serves Bitcoin. If there were 1 million phone companies instead of like 4 or 5, then phones would suck. In fact, we probably wouldn't even have them. But competition makes those companies work for the consumer. Likewise, here the miners are steered by economic incentives to support the BCH network. It's only them that will lose if they do not.
So in short, nothing has changed. So what's all the fuss about when we're about to see an explosion of Bitcoin Cash development? Let's pop the champaign and light the cigars!
submitted by TheFireKnight to btc [link] [comments]

Introduction to Bitterfly: Butterfly Matrix Entropy Weight Consensus Algorithm

When Bitcoin launched 11 years ago, Satoshi Nakamoto had the vision of giving people power over their money. His vision lives on through BTC. However, the Bitcoin network has a few flaws. One of those flaws is the Proof of Work mechanism. Mining Bitcoin requires a huge amount of resources that are out of reach for most ordinary people. The result is that the BTC network is increasingly being placed in centralized control.The Bitterfly project hopes to change that using a revolutionary consensus mechanism called the Buttery that will be used on the Bitterfly blockchain.
About Bitterfly
Bitterfly wants to continue the vision that Nakamoto had for Bitcoin. The goal is to give power back to the people and place them in control of their finances. To do this, the Bitterfly team is working on three main areas that require improvement:
· The consensus mechanism
· The blockchain performance
· Community Governance
The Consensus Mechanism
To improve the consensus mechanism, the team behind Bitterfly has created the Butterfly algorithm that they will add to the PoW mechanism. Not only can it ensures that the hash rate is obtained fairly, it ensures that the hash rate of the whole network is enhanced via the butterfly effect.
Performance
In terms of performance, the Bitterfly blockchain has been upgraded to have a confirmed commercial speed of 5000TPS. Bitterfly is designed as a Blockchain As a Service open-source platform, which can be used in different applications.
Bitterfly will support different types of computing services that include cloud servers. As a result, it will utilize idle server resources to boost the hash rate support for the network.
Community Governance
When it comes to community Governance, Bitterfly plans to introduce a node competition mechanism that will release 210 nodes over time to enhance the butterfly effect. First, they will introduce the nodes via the Butterfly matrix network. Later, they will do so via a fair elimination process. The goal is to ensure that the nodes contribute to the success of Bitterfly.
The Encryption Algorithm
Encryption and decryption of data are at the core of the operation of any blockchain. It helps to guarantee the security of the whole blockchain. Only a corresponding private key can unlock data encrypted using a public key.
In most blockchains, the Hash Function and the Asymmetric Key Encryption Algorithm are used to encrypt and decrypt data. For the Hush Function, the main algorithms used are SHA and MD5.Bitterfly uses the SHA256 algorithm for encryption and RSA, DSA, and Elliptic curve algorithms for decryption. For the verification phase, Bitterfly developed the DFLYSChnorr, which is based on the SCHNOOR algorithm.
Consensus Algorithm
The consensus mechanism is used in the blockchain to ensure that each transaction is accurate. Bitterfly plans to operate within the enterprise space, which requires comprehensive and heterogeneous systems that are integrated with various communication protocols.
To deal with the challenges that might arise, Bitterfly developed a two-layer consensus algorithm for the PoW mechanism called the PBFT algorithm. Here is how the Bitterfly algorithm works:
· The network Structure
Bitterfly is designed as an internet payment and application protocol that is based on embracing the digital economy. It can facilitate value storage as well as the decentralized exchange of digital assets, payments, as well as clearing functions. Within Bitterfly, everyone can participate in productively. It will place a huge demand on Bitterfly. The network will offer performance guarantees as well as smart contracts.
· Bitterfly Consensus Algorithm
To meet the goal of decentralization and security, Bittefly wants to become a global computer instead of a P2P information system. Besides satisfying the decentralization and security needs of its users via PoW, the system will also need to perform at a high level.
As a result, the team opted to support smart contracts in commercial applications. To deal with the issue of energy consumption, the team came up with the Butterfly algorithm. The algorithm allows the use of PoW as well as other cross-chain methods such as the Layer 2 protocol. Confirmation of transactions is done via verification nodes.
Each node is preconfigured with a list of trusted nodes known as the Consensus Achievement List (CAL). The node list can be used to confirm transactions. Once a transaction is confirmed with the local ledger, it is integrated into the transaction candidate set while all illegal ones are discarded.
To improve the security of the network, the verification confirmation was raised to 60% unlike in other networks where it is 50% +1. A transaction is officially confirmed once it is confirmed by 80% of the CAL nodes. The process is known as the Last Closed Ledger, which represents the latest changes to the ledger.
Within Bitterfly, the identities of those taking part in the confirmation of transactions are known beforehand. AS a result, transactions are faster and the blockchain is more efficient.
Butterfly Matrix Entropy Weight Algorithm
Entropy is used to measure the level of uncertainty in the system. Bitterfly built a way to establish consensus using multiple factors. In the network, each data set has a corresponding weight.
Summary
For the past 11 years, Bitcoin has enjoyed tremendous success. The launch of Bitcoin ushered in a new era for humanity. For the first time in history, decentralized money that is outside the control of governments and other central entities is possible.
The new type of money gives people the power to control their finances and avoid the harsh effects of inflation caused by the wanton printing of government currency. When a new economic downturn hit the global economy, Bitcoin failed the litmus test. While Bitcoin should have helped to save people’s finances as the money printing began, it seemed to have followed the same trend as the sinking global economy.
It revealed that BTC still had numerous weaknesses that need to be corrected. Bitterfly wants to build on what Bitcoin has accomplished and do more with it. The team behind this project is quite optimistic. They believe that they can achieve what Bitcoin has achieved in the past 11 years. Besides that, they believe they can achieve where Bitcoin has failed in those past 11 years.
Social Media Links
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/BitterflyD
MEDIUM: https://medium.com/@BitterflyD
YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxSNCzuQsNj-oCgepxzoXQg
TELEGRAM: https://t.me/Bitterfly_Disciples
submitted by Bitterfly_Disciples to u/Bitterfly_Disciples [link] [comments]

Bitcoin (BTC)A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System.

Bitcoin (BTC)A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System.
  • Bitcoin (BTC) is a peer-to-peer cryptocurrency that aims to function as a means of exchange that is independent of any central authority. BTC can be transferred electronically in a secure, verifiable, and immutable way.
  • Launched in 2009, BTC is the first virtual currency to solve the double-spending issue by timestamping transactions before broadcasting them to all of the nodes in the Bitcoin network. The Bitcoin Protocol offered a solution to the Byzantine Generals’ Problem with a blockchain network structure, a notion first created by Stuart Haber and W. Scott Stornetta in 1991.
  • Bitcoin’s whitepaper was published pseudonymously in 2008 by an individual, or a group, with the pseudonym “Satoshi Nakamoto”, whose underlying identity has still not been verified.
  • The Bitcoin protocol uses an SHA-256d-based Proof-of-Work (PoW) algorithm to reach network consensus. Its network has a target block time of 10 minutes and a maximum supply of 21 million tokens, with a decaying token emission rate. To prevent fluctuation of the block time, the network’s block difficulty is re-adjusted through an algorithm based on the past 2016 block times.
  • With a block size limit capped at 1 megabyte, the Bitcoin Protocol has supported both the Lightning Network, a second-layer infrastructure for payment channels, and Segregated Witness, a soft-fork to increase the number of transactions on a block, as solutions to network scalability.

https://preview.redd.it/s2gmpmeze3151.png?width=256&format=png&auto=webp&s=9759910dd3c4a15b83f55b827d1899fb2fdd3de1

1. What is Bitcoin (BTC)?

  • Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer cryptocurrency that aims to function as a means of exchange and is independent of any central authority. Bitcoins are transferred electronically in a secure, verifiable, and immutable way.
  • Network validators, whom are often referred to as miners, participate in the SHA-256d-based Proof-of-Work consensus mechanism to determine the next global state of the blockchain.
  • The Bitcoin protocol has a target block time of 10 minutes, and a maximum supply of 21 million tokens. The only way new bitcoins can be produced is when a block producer generates a new valid block.
  • The protocol has a token emission rate that halves every 210,000 blocks, or approximately every 4 years.
  • Unlike public blockchain infrastructures supporting the development of decentralized applications (Ethereum), the Bitcoin protocol is primarily used only for payments, and has only very limited support for smart contract-like functionalities (Bitcoin “Script” is mostly used to create certain conditions before bitcoins are used to be spent).

2. Bitcoin’s core features

For a more beginner’s introduction to Bitcoin, please visit Binance Academy’s guide to Bitcoin.

Unspent Transaction Output (UTXO) model

A UTXO transaction works like cash payment between two parties: Alice gives money to Bob and receives change (i.e., unspent amount). In comparison, blockchains like Ethereum rely on the account model.
https://preview.redd.it/t1j6anf8f3151.png?width=1601&format=png&auto=webp&s=33bd141d8f2136a6f32739c8cdc7aae2e04cbc47

Nakamoto consensus

In the Bitcoin network, anyone can join the network and become a bookkeeping service provider i.e., a validator. All validators are allowed in the race to become the block producer for the next block, yet only the first to complete a computationally heavy task will win. This feature is called Proof of Work (PoW).
The probability of any single validator to finish the task first is equal to the percentage of the total network computation power, or hash power, the validator has. For instance, a validator with 5% of the total network computation power will have a 5% chance of completing the task first, and therefore becoming the next block producer.
Since anyone can join the race, competition is prone to increase. In the early days, Bitcoin mining was mostly done by personal computer CPUs.
As of today, Bitcoin validators, or miners, have opted for dedicated and more powerful devices such as machines based on Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (“ASIC”).
Proof of Work secures the network as block producers must have spent resources external to the network (i.e., money to pay electricity), and can provide proof to other participants that they did so.
With various miners competing for block rewards, it becomes difficult for one single malicious party to gain network majority (defined as more than 51% of the network’s hash power in the Nakamoto consensus mechanism). The ability to rearrange transactions via 51% attacks indicates another feature of the Nakamoto consensus: the finality of transactions is only probabilistic.
Once a block is produced, it is then propagated by the block producer to all other validators to check on the validity of all transactions in that block. The block producer will receive rewards in the network’s native currency (i.e., bitcoin) as all validators approve the block and update their ledgers.

The blockchain

Block production

The Bitcoin protocol utilizes the Merkle tree data structure in order to organize hashes of numerous individual transactions into each block. This concept is named after Ralph Merkle, who patented it in 1979.
With the use of a Merkle tree, though each block might contain thousands of transactions, it will have the ability to combine all of their hashes and condense them into one, allowing efficient and secure verification of this group of transactions. This single hash called is a Merkle root, which is stored in the Block Header of a block. The Block Header also stores other meta information of a block, such as a hash of the previous Block Header, which enables blocks to be associated in a chain-like structure (hence the name “blockchain”).
An illustration of block production in the Bitcoin Protocol is demonstrated below.

https://preview.redd.it/m6texxicf3151.png?width=1591&format=png&auto=webp&s=f4253304912ed8370948b9c524e08fef28f1c78d

Block time and mining difficulty

Block time is the period required to create the next block in a network. As mentioned above, the node who solves the computationally intensive task will be allowed to produce the next block. Therefore, block time is directly correlated to the amount of time it takes for a node to find a solution to the task. The Bitcoin protocol sets a target block time of 10 minutes, and attempts to achieve this by introducing a variable named mining difficulty.
Mining difficulty refers to how difficult it is for the node to solve the computationally intensive task. If the network sets a high difficulty for the task, while miners have low computational power, which is often referred to as “hashrate”, it would statistically take longer for the nodes to get an answer for the task. If the difficulty is low, but miners have rather strong computational power, statistically, some nodes will be able to solve the task quickly.
Therefore, the 10 minute target block time is achieved by constantly and automatically adjusting the mining difficulty according to how much computational power there is amongst the nodes. The average block time of the network is evaluated after a certain number of blocks, and if it is greater than the expected block time, the difficulty level will decrease; if it is less than the expected block time, the difficulty level will increase.

What are orphan blocks?

In a PoW blockchain network, if the block time is too low, it would increase the likelihood of nodes producingorphan blocks, for which they would receive no reward. Orphan blocks are produced by nodes who solved the task but did not broadcast their results to the whole network the quickest due to network latency.
It takes time for a message to travel through a network, and it is entirely possible for 2 nodes to complete the task and start to broadcast their results to the network at roughly the same time, while one’s messages are received by all other nodes earlier as the node has low latency.
Imagine there is a network latency of 1 minute and a target block time of 2 minutes. A node could solve the task in around 1 minute but his message would take 1 minute to reach the rest of the nodes that are still working on the solution. While his message travels through the network, all the work done by all other nodes during that 1 minute, even if these nodes also complete the task, would go to waste. In this case, 50% of the computational power contributed to the network is wasted.
The percentage of wasted computational power would proportionally decrease if the mining difficulty were higher, as it would statistically take longer for miners to complete the task. In other words, if the mining difficulty, and therefore targeted block time is low, miners with powerful and often centralized mining facilities would get a higher chance of becoming the block producer, while the participation of weaker miners would become in vain. This introduces possible centralization and weakens the overall security of the network.
However, given a limited amount of transactions that can be stored in a block, making the block time too longwould decrease the number of transactions the network can process per second, negatively affecting network scalability.

3. Bitcoin’s additional features

Segregated Witness (SegWit)

Segregated Witness, often abbreviated as SegWit, is a protocol upgrade proposal that went live in August 2017.
SegWit separates witness signatures from transaction-related data. Witness signatures in legacy Bitcoin blocks often take more than 50% of the block size. By removing witness signatures from the transaction block, this protocol upgrade effectively increases the number of transactions that can be stored in a single block, enabling the network to handle more transactions per second. As a result, SegWit increases the scalability of Nakamoto consensus-based blockchain networks like Bitcoin and Litecoin.
SegWit also makes transactions cheaper. Since transaction fees are derived from how much data is being processed by the block producer, the more transactions that can be stored in a 1MB block, the cheaper individual transactions become.
https://preview.redd.it/depya70mf3151.png?width=1601&format=png&auto=webp&s=a6499aa2131fbf347f8ffd812930b2f7d66be48e
The legacy Bitcoin block has a block size limit of 1 megabyte, and any change on the block size would require a network hard-fork. On August 1st 2017, the first hard-fork occurred, leading to the creation of Bitcoin Cash (“BCH”), which introduced an 8 megabyte block size limit.
Conversely, Segregated Witness was a soft-fork: it never changed the transaction block size limit of the network. Instead, it added an extended block with an upper limit of 3 megabytes, which contains solely witness signatures, to the 1 megabyte block that contains only transaction data. This new block type can be processed even by nodes that have not completed the SegWit protocol upgrade.
Furthermore, the separation of witness signatures from transaction data solves the malleability issue with the original Bitcoin protocol. Without Segregated Witness, these signatures could be altered before the block is validated by miners. Indeed, alterations can be done in such a way that if the system does a mathematical check, the signature would still be valid. However, since the values in the signature are changed, the two signatures would create vastly different hash values.
For instance, if a witness signature states “6,” it has a mathematical value of 6, and would create a hash value of 12345. However, if the witness signature were changed to “06”, it would maintain a mathematical value of 6 while creating a (faulty) hash value of 67890.
Since the mathematical values are the same, the altered signature remains a valid signature. This would create a bookkeeping issue, as transactions in Nakamoto consensus-based blockchain networks are documented with these hash values, or transaction IDs. Effectively, one can alter a transaction ID to a new one, and the new ID can still be valid.
This can create many issues, as illustrated in the below example:
  1. Alice sends Bob 1 BTC, and Bob sends Merchant Carol this 1 BTC for some goods.
  2. Bob sends Carols this 1 BTC, while the transaction from Alice to Bob is not yet validated. Carol sees this incoming transaction of 1 BTC to him, and immediately ships goods to B.
  3. At the moment, the transaction from Alice to Bob is still not confirmed by the network, and Bob can change the witness signature, therefore changing this transaction ID from 12345 to 67890.
  4. Now Carol will not receive his 1 BTC, as the network looks for transaction 12345 to ensure that Bob’s wallet balance is valid.
  5. As this particular transaction ID changed from 12345 to 67890, the transaction from Bob to Carol will fail, and Bob will get his goods while still holding his BTC.
With the Segregated Witness upgrade, such instances can not happen again. This is because the witness signatures are moved outside of the transaction block into an extended block, and altering the witness signature won’t affect the transaction ID.
Since the transaction malleability issue is fixed, Segregated Witness also enables the proper functioning of second-layer scalability solutions on the Bitcoin protocol, such as the Lightning Network.

Lightning Network

Lightning Network is a second-layer micropayment solution for scalability.
Specifically, Lightning Network aims to enable near-instant and low-cost payments between merchants and customers that wish to use bitcoins.
Lightning Network was conceptualized in a whitepaper by Joseph Poon and Thaddeus Dryja in 2015. Since then, it has been implemented by multiple companies. The most prominent of them include Blockstream, Lightning Labs, and ACINQ.
A list of curated resources relevant to Lightning Network can be found here.
In the Lightning Network, if a customer wishes to transact with a merchant, both of them need to open a payment channel, which operates off the Bitcoin blockchain (i.e., off-chain vs. on-chain). None of the transaction details from this payment channel are recorded on the blockchain, and only when the channel is closed will the end result of both party’s wallet balances be updated to the blockchain. The blockchain only serves as a settlement layer for Lightning transactions.
Since all transactions done via the payment channel are conducted independently of the Nakamoto consensus, both parties involved in transactions do not need to wait for network confirmation on transactions. Instead, transacting parties would pay transaction fees to Bitcoin miners only when they decide to close the channel.
https://preview.redd.it/cy56icarf3151.png?width=1601&format=png&auto=webp&s=b239a63c6a87ec6cc1b18ce2cbd0355f8831c3a8
One limitation to the Lightning Network is that it requires a person to be online to receive transactions attributing towards him. Another limitation in user experience could be that one needs to lock up some funds every time he wishes to open a payment channel, and is only able to use that fund within the channel.
However, this does not mean he needs to create new channels every time he wishes to transact with a different person on the Lightning Network. If Alice wants to send money to Carol, but they do not have a payment channel open, they can ask Bob, who has payment channels open to both Alice and Carol, to help make that transaction. Alice will be able to send funds to Bob, and Bob to Carol. Hence, the number of “payment hubs” (i.e., Bob in the previous example) correlates with both the convenience and the usability of the Lightning Network for real-world applications.

Schnorr Signature upgrade proposal

Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (“ECDSA”) signatures are used to sign transactions on the Bitcoin blockchain.
https://preview.redd.it/hjeqe4l7g3151.png?width=1601&format=png&auto=webp&s=8014fb08fe62ac4d91645499bc0c7e1c04c5d7c4
However, many developers now advocate for replacing ECDSA with Schnorr Signature. Once Schnorr Signatures are implemented, multiple parties can collaborate in producing a signature that is valid for the sum of their public keys.
This would primarily be beneficial for network scalability. When multiple addresses were to conduct transactions to a single address, each transaction would require their own signature. With Schnorr Signature, all these signatures would be combined into one. As a result, the network would be able to store more transactions in a single block.
https://preview.redd.it/axg3wayag3151.png?width=1601&format=png&auto=webp&s=93d958fa6b0e623caa82ca71fe457b4daa88c71e
The reduced size in signatures implies a reduced cost on transaction fees. The group of senders can split the transaction fees for that one group signature, instead of paying for one personal signature individually.
Schnorr Signature also improves network privacy and token fungibility. A third-party observer will not be able to detect if a user is sending a multi-signature transaction, since the signature will be in the same format as a single-signature transaction.

4. Economics and supply distribution

The Bitcoin protocol utilizes the Nakamoto consensus, and nodes validate blocks via Proof-of-Work mining. The bitcoin token was not pre-mined, and has a maximum supply of 21 million. The initial reward for a block was 50 BTC per block. Block mining rewards halve every 210,000 blocks. Since the average time for block production on the blockchain is 10 minutes, it implies that the block reward halving events will approximately take place every 4 years.
As of May 12th 2020, the block mining rewards are 6.25 BTC per block. Transaction fees also represent a minor revenue stream for miners.
submitted by D-platform to u/D-platform [link] [comments]

Waltonchain adds GNU General Public License details to code - BUT does the code contain this?

Waltonchain adds GNU General Public License details to code - BUT does the code contain this?
Dear Crypto community,
Yesterday we saw Waltonchain release their Open Source code which resulted in huge criticism regarding the oversight of removing the original copyright to the original codebase, Ethereum Go, on which it is based.
Following this, the team have now updated the code to show the original copyright:
Image from Github
Source: https://github.com/WaltonChain/WaltonChain_Gwtc_Src/blob/mastep2p/rlpx.go?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app
Github: https://github.com/WaltonChain?tab=repositories

I'd like to say thank you to the community for having such strong opinion on this matter, and for all the subreddit admins that assisted in creating clarity toward this. As a global community we should hold every blockchain up to the same standards, and I am grateful that this was shown in regard to the GNU General Public License.

Now that the issue is resolved, and since Waltonchain is currently a hot topic, I implore all the coders and devs out there to delve deep into the code to see exactly what Waltonchain have released. Not just the modification to the eth codebase, but the additional code. What does the code allow?

What we've been told as a community is that the Waltonchain source code has changes that allows for:
  • Security - DASH X11 - Most cryptographic algorithms used in cryptocurrencies use only one hash function for calculation. There are 11 of them in X11, which provides a higher degree of protection against hackers and scams. Waltonchain has customised the DASH X11 hashing algorithm to fit their purpose.
  • More secure than Bitcoin. The Bitcoin algorithm is SHA-256 is based on a previous secure hash algorithm family of standards, namely SHA-2, the hash functions within the X11 algorithm all successfully made it into the second-round in search for a new, more secure standard — SHA-3. Keccak, the function which won the competition and is therefore the new standard on which SHA-3 is based on, can at the very least be considered more secure that SHA-256.
  • Efficiency — Waltonchain have produced ASICs with the equivalent hashing power of 200GPUs (32–40kW) whilst using only 135W, thus helping the parent chain become decentralised
  • PoS aspect works in tandem with PoW, in that it adds a reduced difficulty based on number of coins held and time between blocks. Effectively the longer coins are held and the longer the time between blocks, the lower the difficulty for mining blocks. This again enhances the power efficiency of the network in its entirety.
  • Fast cross-chain searching via Proof of Labour —PoL enables hash values or indices from sub-chains (child chains) to be synced with the parent chain in a ‘cross chain index mechanism’ to enable fast searches for data via the parent chain.
  • Scalibility — Unlimited scalibility due to child chains; each CC is an independent blockchain (or DAG) using its own consensus mechanism (PoS, PoA, PoW, PoeT, etc) and can store data within itself. The parent chain by nature therefore cannot become bloated.
  • Atomic Swaps — PoL by nature ensures a record of every inter-chain transaction is held, and allows the function of atomic swaps between currencies.

Also to note is that the code has been audited by Knownsec, the same company that audited projects like HPB and NANO.

Lets have an open dialogue and talk about these features of the code - but firstly, do they exist? Hopefully people will approach this with the same enthusiasm as they did yesterday.

EDIT 1st June: A user on the Waltonchain sub has done an analysis which by the looks of it, disproves the initial assessment by many of the 'blockchain experts' in cc that have said the open source code is simply a copy and paste . https://www.reddit.com/waltonchain/comments/bveqea/changeset_goethereum_v171_to_gwtc_v110/
It is interesting to see just how much people love to hate Waltonchain that they spread misinformation either intentionally, or unintentionally, and that it gets the most attention out of any announcement.

For reference:
Block explorer: www.Waltonchain.pro (all wallets, mining wallet, documentation etc is available via that link)
submitted by Yayowam to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

CODE FUD: Resolved.

Dear Waltonchain community,
Yesterday we saw Waltonchain release their Open Source code which resulted in huge criticism regarding the oversight of removing the original copyright to the original codebase, Ethereum Go, on which it is based.
Following this, the team have now updated the code to show the original copyright:
Source: https://github.com/WaltonChain/WaltonChain_Gwtc_Src/blob/mastep2p/rlpx.go?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app
Github: https://github.com/WaltonChain?tab=repositories

I'd like to say thank you to the community for having such strong opinion on this matter, and for all the subreddit admins that assisted in creating clarity toward this. As a global community we should hold every blockchain up to the same standards, and I am grateful that this was shown in regard to the GNU General Public License.

Now that the issue is resolved, and since Waltonchain is currently a hot topic, I implore all the coders and devs out there to delve deep into the code to see exactly what Waltonchain have released. Not just the modification to the eth codebase, but the additional code. What does the code allow?

What we've been told as a community is that the Waltonchain source code has changes that allows for:

Also to note is that the code has been audited by Knownsec, the same company that audited projects like HPB and NANO.

Lets have an open dialogue and talk about these features of the code - but firstly, do they exist? Hopefully people will approach this with the same enthusiasm as they did yesterday.

For reference:
Block explorer: www.Waltonchain.pro (all wallets, mining wallet, documentation etc is available via that link)
submitted by Yayowam to waltonchain [link] [comments]

The 8 Skills to Be a Good Miner

Many people may feel quite confused about their low profit now. Maybe you forget to think about the small details when you are mining. Small little details will make big difference in your final income.
Now, i want to share you the 8 skills to improve your benefits.
1, Get a cheaper power
Everyone knows the power is the most charge in mining, if we can find a cheaper electricity, it will be good. So, how to get a cheaper electricity?
55% of the mining is in China, and 40% of the mining is in Sichuan China. Why? Because there are many hydroelectric power station in there. So, you can find a place near the station and get a cheaper electricity from them.
If you can find free electricity, it is the best anyway
2, Choose low w/t machine
As you know, low comsuption machine is very popular those days, like S17 pro 53t, T17 42t. They are 7nm technical, the w/t is low and it can even overclock, it maybe a good choice. Also, we need to consider the price of machine.
Cheap price machine means fast ROI, But low W/T machine has a bright future.
3, Buy miner when BTC begin to raise after long drop
When BTC price keep falling, of course the machine will be cheaper and cheaper. When the BTC price begin to raise, we can buy miner at that time, because the price is the cheapset and you can earn money back soon.
Normally at that time, the good machine will be sold out quickly, when the market feedback that those machine are good, you may be late to get the chance. So, make your plan for purchasing before, when price down, get them.
4, Do not forget BCH, BSV, ZEN coin
Do remember SHA-256 Algorithm can mining BCH and BSV as well. Sometimes those coin may get even a better profits than BTC.
Some miner has auto setting for BTC, but you can choose BSV and BCH mining if you set it,
5, Notice the half reward period information
Because the half reward time is coming in 2020, there will be a chance or a risk for it. Many low hashrate machine may be out of the style and high hashrate will be more competitive.
Low your risk and not to buy those cheap machine now
6, Choose a good future crypto currency
There are many coins in this field now, we need to analyse and find a better direction for mining. Like Z11, many people use it for ZEN mining nowadays, and their benefits is top now.
Also, people buy many S17, it can earn money back before next year half reward time. And they believe the BTC price will increase creazily as last two times.
7, Make plan for your selling of coin or machine
As you know, the price of the BTC changes everytime, we can mining the BTC first and keep it in hand, do not sell it every day. It is very stupid. Just sell it when price high, you do not need to take any risk if you do not buy BTC directy. We do not need to care about the low price situation, we only need to wait. When chance come, get it.
Same for machine
8. Don't be fooled by the mining calculator
Many sites calculate mining profits based on hardware and electricity prices. If you've never mined before, you might be happy to see the numbers provided by these websites and calculators and think, "I'll make a fortune!"
However, these websites don't tell you: in addition to the cost of electricity, there may be other current costs, such as maintenance, cooling, rent, labor, etc. Generally, the hash rate and power consumption of the device are slightly different from what the factory says.
This difference is more common in unpopular brands. You can better understand the actual hash rate and the actual power consumption by watching the miner test video on YouTube. In addition, depending on the distance from the meter to the device and the type of cable used, the power loss from the meter to the device can be as high as 200 watts.
In addition to the cost of mining machines, some initial costs are required to prepare the infrastructure, such as cooling and venting, cabling and distribution, shelves, network and monitoring equipment, safety measures, etc.
The network difficulty is constantly changing and increasing at a significant speed, which directly affects the mining revenue. You can check the bitcoin network difficulty chart to see its growth rate, but your miner will not always be 100% active.
Due to maintenance, network problems, ore pool problems, power problems and many other problems, the miner may be offline for several hours. I suggest that you consider setting the normal operation time of the miner to less than 97% when calculating. We have rich mining experience in professional ore pools, and the normal operation time of these mining machines will not exceed 97-98%.
Thats all, hope those information will help you become a good mining investor.
submitted by 15Ansel to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

What does the portfolio look like from someone who mined his first bitcoins in 2011. I'll show you.

I mined my first bitcoin in 2011. Chances are, Ive been in crypto longer than you. I probably have more than you. But what I dont have, and never had, is a crystal ball. So Ive spent bitcoins on trivia when they where worth $5. I have given away enough bitcoin and cascacius coins to buy a house with today. I was soundly asleep when ethereum launched. I was late to recognise that not all altcoins where quite as pointless as the ones that where launched when I mined. For a long time, Ive grossly underestimated the gullibility of people new to crypto. Thats why despite having mined bitcoins in the GPU era, Im not a bazillionaire. Yet :).
Anyway, with that disclaimer out of the way, lets see what I have in portfolio now.
~25% in fiat.
Yes. Eeck. Blasphemy. I played it safe. I took profits. I keep fiat at hand to be able to buy dips. Bonus effect: each time the market goes down, I put Delta to show my portfolio in BTC, and then it goes up :)
~25% in bitcoin
Bitcoin is still the gold standard in crypto. Nothing else is even remotely as secure or battle tested. The protocol is simple (compared to most), the code and game theory behind it extremely well researched and it has resisted massive coordinated attacks for almost 10 years now. Its not perfect, its far from finished. We all know what it cant do (yet). But its developers do not compromise on security or decentralisation to achieve goals like low fees or fast transactions. Instead, the brightest minds in crypto innovate and develop layer 2 and layer 3 scaling solutions, without compromising the base layer. I like that approach. A lot. Its much more important to do it right than to do it quickly.
So why hold on to bitcoin? In the long run, I dont believe there will be 100s or thousands of significant public blockchains. There wil be tens of thousands of tokens and dapps, but I think they will converge on a very small number of secure, proven blockchains that will act like as their baselayer. Much like TCPIP for the internet. That cant happen before we solve scalability, so this migration is still years away. But when it happens, chances are very high bitcoin and/or ethereum will be among those precious few de facto standard base layers.
20% Waltonchain.
This is my largest altcoin investment to date. A blockchain solution for the supply chain, tightly integrating RFID. Its in many ways comparable with VEN, which was my previous largest (and one of my better) altcoin gambles. But Ive been converting my VEN profits slowly in to WTC tokens, because I think its actually a better bet. Having their own RFID tags and readers gives it some abilities that a software-only solution cant match. I like the team (a lot), I like the fact its not (yet) being shilled and hyped in to oblivion. I particularly like the much lower market cap compared to VEN now. Im not a great fan of masternode PoS mining for securing a network, but there is no denying this approach is great for creating token holder value. I can see this go x10 in a short time.
10% ethereum
I used to have a far larger % in ethereum, for all the obvious reasons I dont think I need to explain. Ive taken my profits on ethereum recently, simply because it went parabolic. I expect to increase my stake in ethereum this year, Im just waiting for some buying opportunities, or selling opportunities for of my other tokens.
5% Monero
I think this also needs little explanation. If anything, Id need to explain why I dont own more monero. You guessed it, I recently took profits, and Im waiting for an opportunity to buy more.
5% iExec RLC
There are many blockchains and tokens tackling the distributed computing market. Siacoin, golem, ... I think RLC's approach is more universal, flexible and potentially can solve the same problems that all the other tokens target individually. I like it runs on ethereum, not its own private chain. The team is super impressive and the valuation low compared to almost everything else on CMC. Its not even top 100.
2% SophiaTX
I wanted some exposure to ERP/blockchain integration, because along with supply chain management and distributed computing, this is one of the more obvious blockchain applications. SPHTX seemed like a good choice. Very focused on this particular (gigantic) market and you probably never heard of it.
2% Modum
Another supply chain solution, but what sets modum apart, is that it is a real company with a real product solving a real problem in the real economy with actually deployed blockchain technology! How rare is that? If nothing else, modum proves that blockchain isnt just hype and bubbles. Their focus is currently rather narrow (temperature monitoring for drug transport), but I like that, and the same technology can be deployed much wider. If ever you need to explain to someone what real world problems decentralised blockchains can solve, this is a good example.
1% blockpool
Not gonna lie, this is just a gamble. I wanted a (really) low cap investment. Someone convinced me to try BPL, I only glanced at it. So far, it hasnt worked out brilliantly yet :).
1% OAX
Decentralised exchanges are the future, I am convinced of that. Now if OAX as a token makes a lot of sense, I honestly cant say. Once again, I didnt research this very much, I just saw a small cap token targeting a market I think will explode. Will this token? No idea.
1% QTUM
QTUM is one of the more credible challengers to ethereum. I far prefer it over NEO's extremely centralised politburo approach. This used to be far more than 1% of my portfolio, but Ive taken my profits as I think its current valuation is not unreasonable compared to the competition. The 1% remaining is just for FOMO.
1% Aeternity
I bought this mostly because of the low power, memory bound proof of work consensus algorithm. Im convinced nothing will ever be as secure as proof of work, but Im also not blind to its downsides. Aeternity could combine the best of both worlds, providing similar security without the energy requirements and without all the downsides of PoS. Will it work and be as secure as SHA hashing? I dont know, but as I understand, their PoW algorithm is comparable to the travelling salesman problem, which is one of the most researched problems in computer science.
0.5% Nimiq
Another tiny market cap gamble that I thought might appeal to crypto noobs. I dont particularly believe this has any long term prospects whatsoever, and saying that probably wont help :).
The rest I have is dust, leftovers, and tiny fomo positions. Including bytom, iota, ink, humaniq, raiblocks, mywish, tierion and GVT.
A few notable coins Ive had, but no longer have in portfolio:
Zcash. During the recent rally, I needed to rebalance my portfolio towards fiat and I had zcash and monero at hand on Kraken, so I sold those. I plan to buy in again at some point.
Cardano. its certainly a very interesting and promising project. I bought it low, sold it at 10x. It went way higher than that. The current valuation makes no sense to me for something so unproven.
Basic Attention Token. Sold them recently to take profits. Current valuation seems high-ish to me, but still a token to keep an eye on.
Ripple. Yes, I have owned ripple. Well, I got the first ones free when they launched, and sold those ages ago. But I bought in again recently because I assumed it would appeal to newbies that just got in to crypto and saw this fraction-of-a-dollar "crypto" that works instantly and with no fees and with all the banking relations. That assumption paid off handsomely. Took my profits, felt dirty, wont touch it with a ten foot pole anymore.
Neo/antshares. I bought this when it was still called antshares. Right now, its a glorified database application that could just as well be run on an oracle database and be 10x faster and more robust. Their plan to decentralise seems to be handpicking bookkeeper candidates that Neo holders can then vote for. You know, like people can vote for handpicked political candidates in china. The actual voting algorithm is also extremely suspect to game theory attacks, if ever they drop the authoritarian approach. Im sure the Chinese government loves Neo though. Never been easier to take control over a blockchain. With the constant news of governments beginning to crack down on crypto, I hope and expect ICO's come to see the danger of this, and select more decentralised open blockchains to run their dapps on.
submitted by Vertigo722 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

What is cryptocurrency halving

What is cryptocurrency halving

https://preview.redd.it/nzm9ms8g67741.png?width=900&format=png&auto=webp&s=14073c6b2d08e09f4d57dc35a7d5ff3ae54a771a
Cryptocurrency halving is a process in which the reward value for each mined transaction block is halved. The halving ensures that the crypto asset will follow a stable emission rate until its maximum supply is reached.
Halving plays an important role in cryptocurrencies based on the Proof-of-Work (PoW) consensus algorithm. It is a fundamental factor that inevitably has an effect on the price of the cryptocurrency. In addition, halving significantly affects the interests of miners, since their profit depends on it.
In this article we would like to consider the most famous coins which are waiting for halving in the near future.

Zcash

Zcash (ZEC) is in the top 50 of the biggest cryptocurrencies in the world now. The first block was mined at the end of 2016, so the first halving will take place at the end of 2020. You can follow Zcash halving countdown here.
Currently every miner gets 12.5 ZEC per block. But each 4-year period (or 840,000 mined blocks) the volume of ZEC production is halved (from 12.5 to 6.25 to 3.125 to 1.5625, etc.).
Early investors put $3 million to fund the Zcash creation. In return for that money they agreed that the investors would receive a small fraction of the Electric Coin Company’s equity along with a slice of the Founder’s Rewards coins. At the moment the activities of ECC are sponsored by a network commission. 20% of the commission goes to the development of the project but in a year the developers will stop receiving their share from the extraction of digital coins. It will be possible to measure the impact of this factor on the Zcash price next year.

Litecoin

Litecoin (LTC) was created in 2011 by former Google employee Charlie Lee. Despite the fact that the coin isn’t new, this asset is still quite popular and has the 6th largest capitalization now.
https://preview.redd.it/1g5gpztl67741.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=210b8d4c1f886dd0cd327f0471ac9179ef0f1048
LTC was based on the Bitcoin software code. However, there are several significant differences between these two cryptocurrencies. For example, unlike Bitcoin, Litecoin is based on the Scrypt hash algorithm, not SHA-256. The main difference between the Scrypt hash algorithm and SHA-256: the more powerful software is needed for the Scrypt hash algorithm. That’s why LTC mining is more profitable.
In addition, LTC block production time is 2.5 minutes, which is 4 times faster than BTC. Therefore, transactions on the Litecoin network are much faster than Bitcoin. There is the Litecoin Halving History:
  • Litecoin Halving on August 8th, 2015. The amount of the reward for mining was reduced from 50 to 25 LTC. The first halving happened after 840,000 blocks. By then 50% of LTC (42 million LTC) was mined.
  • Litecoin Halving on August 5th, 2019. The amount of the reward for mining was reduced from 25 to 12.5 LTC. The second halving happened after 1,680,000 blocks. By that time 75% of LTC (63 million LTC) was mined. Due to the growth in trading volumes, the coin pumped more than 10% breaking the line of $ 100.
  • The next Litecoin halving is expected to be on August 3rd, 2023. By that moment 252,000,000 blocks will have been unraveled and 73.5 million LTC will have been mined. If you want to follow Litecoin halving countdown, tap here.

Bitcoin

Bitcoin’s total supply is limited to 21,000,000 BTC. In this regard, Bitcoin is a deflationary asset.
When Bitcoin was created, the reward for the block was 50 BTC, which means the miner could receive 50 BTC coins every 10 minutes. This was at a time when miners used ordinary laptops and Bitcoin cost a few cents.
https://preview.redd.it/0nmeyssp67741.jpg?width=640&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=eea8492b90887aa7db445e9f5db2c7978437dcc1
Since the creation of the genesis block the Bitcoin halving has happened twice:
  • November 28th, 2012 – the reward decreased from 50 BTC to 25 BTC. Three months before halving, the price of Bitcoin increased by 18%, and 90 days after this event – by 141%.
  • July 9th, 2016 – the reward decreased from 25 BTC to 12.5 BTC. Within 90 days before the second halving the Bitcoin’s price increased by 54%. However, mining income has not recovered to its previous values. This could be due to the high competition between the miners, which led to a significant increase in the complexity of Bitcoin mining.
  • The third Bitcoin halving will happen in 2020. Then the reward for the found block will be reduced from 12.5 to 6.25 BTC. Halving will be repeated every 4 years until the last Bitcoin is mined. It is about to happen in 2140. You can follow the Bitcoin halving countdown here.
According to analysts, before the first halving, which occurred in November 2012, the price of Bitcoin was $ 2.55. And a year after this event it grew to $ 1,037. Curiously, after that, the cryptocurrency fell almost four times, to $ 268. However, after the second halving, BTC not only returned to $ 1,037 but also overcame this level 2.5 times: Bitcoin went up to $ 2,525 in July 2017.
Cryptoanalysts note that the growth of cryptocurrency is always affected by halving. The cryptocurrencies rates usually start to grow closer to the date of halving. This theory is illustrated by the situation with BTC which price rose significantly before every halving.

Feel free to follow our updates and news on Twitter, Facebook, Telegram and BitcoinTalk. Read what the customers say about SimpleSwap on Trustpilot. Don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions you may have via [[email protected].](mailto:[email protected])
submitted by SimpleSwapExchange to CryptoBeginners [link] [comments]

The only way to compete with Jihan, is to design a better ASIC.

The same people buying mining hardware from Jihan and strengthening his hand, are the same ones complaining about Jihan.
I see all these miners complaining about Bitmain, and yet not seeming to realise that they are the ones funding their business.
What do you think Bitmain does with the profit from selling miners? They manufacture more miners for themselves. And they get them at cost.
You cannot beat Bitmain by buying products from them. They will always win at that game. You buy one S9 from them, they make 2 more for themselves with your money.
It's like complaining that McDonalds is evil whilst stuffing your face with a Big Mac.
The only way to compete with Bitmain, is to design a better ASIC. Americans own the CPU industry. Why is there no American competition for an SHA-256 ASIC?
Bitcoin is designed for miners to have the vote. The only way to even the vote is to have competition. And there isn't any.
Maybe instead of uselessly whinging that somebody else won the race (it's like Intel complaining about ARM - pointless), somebody needs to start training for the next heat?
submitted by theantnest to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Debunked: "Satoshi never anticipated ASICs and miner centralization. Clearly 'CPU' in the white paper is a reference to the processors used in regular home computers."

Satoshi:
Only people trying to create new coins would need to run network nodes. At first, most users would run network nodes, but as the network grows beyond a certain point, it would be left more and more to specialists with server farms of specialized hardware. A server farm would only need to have one node on the network and the rest of the LAN connects with that one node.
Source
The proof-of-work is a Hashcash style SHA-256 collision finding. It's a memoryless process where you do millions of hashes a second, with a small chance of finding one each time. The 3 or 4 fastest nodes' dominance would only be proportional to their share of the total CPU power . . .
. . . There will be transaction fees, so nodes will have an incentive to receive and include all the transactions they can.
Source
I made the proof-of-work difficulty ridiculously easy to start with, so for a little while in the beginning a typical PC will be able to generate coins in just a few hours. It'll get a lot harder when competition makes the automatic adjustment drive up the difficulty.
Source
The current system where every user is a network node is not the intended configuration for large scale. That would be like every Usenet user runs their own NNTP server. The more burden it is to run a node, the fewer nodes there will be. Those few nodes will be big server farms. The rest will be client nodes that only do transactions and don't generate.
Source
As if the above quotes were not enough, Satoshis announcement post on the email lists came right in the midst of precisely a discussion about ASICs and FPGAs. After the conversation about Bitcoin died out on the list, eventually discussion about ASICs, quantum computing and even Mores Law (which was claimed to be refuted) picked up again.
submitted by fruitsofknowledge to btc [link] [comments]

A reminder why CryptoNote protocol was created...

CryptoNote v 2.0 Nicolas van Saberhagen October 17, 2013
1 Introduction
“Bitcoin” [1] has been a successful implementation of the concept of p2p electronic cash. Both professionals and the general public have come to appreciate the convenient combination of public transactions and proof-of-work as a trust model. Today, the user base of electronic cash is growing at a steady pace; customers are attracted to low fees and the anonymity provided by electronic cash and merchants value its predicted and decentralized emission. Bitcoin has effectively proved that electronic cash can be as simple as paper money and as convenient as credit cards.
Unfortunately, Bitcoin suffers from several deficiencies. For example, the system’s distributed nature is inflexible, preventing the implementation of new features until almost all of the net- work users update their clients. Some critical flaws that cannot be fixed rapidly deter Bitcoin’s widespread propagation. In such inflexible models, it is more efficient to roll-out a new project rather than perpetually fix the original project.
In this paper, we study and propose solutions to the main deficiencies of Bitcoin. We believe that a system taking into account the solutions we propose will lead to a healthy competition among different electronic cash systems. We also propose our own electronic cash, “CryptoNote”, a name emphasizing the next breakthrough in electronic cash.
2 Bitcoin drawbacks and some possible solutions
2.1 Traceability of transactions
Privacy and anonymity are the most important aspects of electronic cash. Peer-to-peer payments seek to be concealed from third party’s view, a distinct difference when compared with traditional banking. In particular, T. Okamoto and K. Ohta described six criteria of ideal electronic cash, which included “privacy: relationship between the user and his purchases must be untraceable by anyone” [30]. From their description, we derived two properties which a fully anonymous electronic cash model must satisfy in order to comply with the requirements outlined by Okamoto and Ohta:
Untraceability: for each incoming transaction all possible senders are equiprobable.
Unlinkability: for any two outgoing transactions it is impossible to prove they were sent to the same person.
Unfortunately, Bitcoin does not satisfy the untraceability requirement. Since all the trans- actions that take place between the network’s participants are public, any transaction can be unambiguously traced to a unique origin and final recipient. Even if two participants exchange funds in an indirect way, a properly engineered path-finding method will reveal the origin and final recipient.
It is also suspected that Bitcoin does not satisfy the second property. Some researchers stated ([33, 35, 29, 31]) that a careful blockchain analysis may reveal a connection between the users of the Bitcoin network and their transactions. Although a number of methods are disputed [25], it is suspected that a lot of hidden personal information can be extracted from the public database.
Bitcoin’s failure to satisfy the two properties outlined above leads us to conclude that it is not an anonymous but a pseudo-anonymous electronic cash system. Users were quick to develop solutions to circumvent this shortcoming. Two direct solutions were “laundering services” [2] and the development of distributed methods [3, 4]. Both solutions are based on the idea of mixing several public transactions and sending them through some intermediary address; which in turn suffers the drawback of requiring a trusted third party. Recently, a more creative scheme was proposed by I. Miers et al. [28]: “Zerocoin”. Zerocoin utilizes a cryptographic one-way accumulators and zero-knoweldge proofs which permit users to “convert” bitcoins to zerocoins and spend them using anonymous proof of ownership instead of explicit public-key based digital signatures. However, such knowledge proofs have a constant but inconvenient size - about 30kb (based on today’s Bitcoin limits), which makes the proposal impractical. Authors admit that the protocol is unlikely to ever be accepted by the majority of Bitcoin users [5].
2.2 The proof-of-work function
Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto described the majority decision making algorithm as “one- CPU-one-vote” and used a CPU-bound pricing function (double SHA-256) for his proof-of-work scheme. Since users vote for the single history of transactions order [1], the reasonableness and consistency of this process are critical conditions for the whole system.
The security of this model suffers from two drawbacks. First, it requires 51% of the network’s mining power to be under the control of honest users. Secondly, the system’s progress (bug fixes, security fixes, etc...) require the overwhelming majority of users to support and agree to the changes (this occurs when the users update their wallet software) [6].Finally this same voting mechanism is also used for collective polls about implementation of some features [7].
This permits us to conjecture the properties that must be satisfied by the proof-of-work pricing function. Such function must not enable a network participant to have a significant advantage over another participant; it requires a parity between common hardware and high cost of custom devices. From recent examples [8], we can see that the SHA-256 function used in the Bitcoin architecture does not posses this property as mining becomes more efficient on GPUs and ASIC devices when compared to high-end CPUs.
Therefore, Bitcoin creates favourable conditions for a large gap between the voting power of participants as it violates the “one-CPU-one-vote” principle since GPU and ASIC owners posses a much larger voting power when compared with CPU owners. It is a classical example of the Pareto principle where 20% of a system’s participants control more than 80% of the votes.
One could argue that such inequality is not relevant to the network’s security since it is not the small number of participants controlling the majority of the votes but the honesty of these participants that matters. However, such argument is somewhat flawed since it is rather the possibility of cheap specialized hardware appearing rather than the participants’ honesty which poses a threat. To demonstrate this, let us take the following example. Suppose a malevolent individual gains significant mining power by creating his own mining farm through the cheap hardware described previously. Suppose that the global hashrate decreases significantly, even for a moment, he can now use his mining power to fork the chain and double-spend. As we shall see later in this article, it is not unlikely for the previously described event to take place.
2.3 Irregular emission
Bitcoin has a predetermined emission rate: each solved block produces a fixed amount of coins. Approximately every four years this reward is halved. The original intention was to create a limited smooth emission with exponential decay, but in fact we have a piecewise linear emission function whose breakpoints may cause problems to the Bitcoin infrastructure.
When the breakpoint occurs, miners start to receive only half of the value of their previous reward. The absolute difference between 12.5 and 6.25 BTC (projected for the year 2020) may seem tolerable. However, when examining the 50 to 25 BTC drop that took place on November 28 2012, felt inappropriate for a significant number of members of the mining community. Figure 1 shows a dramatic decrease in the network’s hashrate in the end of November, exactly when the halving took place. This event could have been the perfect moment for the malevolent individual described in the proof-of-work function section to carry-out a double spending attack [36]. Fig. 1. Bitcoin hashrate chart (source: http://bitcoin.sipa.be)
2.4 Hardcoded constants
Bitcoin has many hard-coded limits, where some are natural elements of the original design (e.g. block frequency, maximum amount of money supply, number of confirmations) whereas other seem to be artificial constraints. It is not so much the limits, as the inability of quickly changing them if necessary that causes the main drawbacks. Unfortunately, it is hard to predict when the constants may need to be changed and replacing them may lead to terrible consequences.
A good example of a hardcoded limit change leading to disastrous consequences is the block size limit set to 250kb1. This limit was sufficient to hold about 10000 standard transactions. In early 2013, this limit had almost been reached and an agreement was reached to increase the limit. The change was implemented in wallet version 0.8 and ended with a 24-blocks chain split and a successful double-spend attack [9]. While the bug was not in the Bitcoin protocol, but rather in the database engine it could have been easily caught by a simple stress test if there was no artificially introduced block size limit.
Constants also act as a form of centralization point. Despite the peer-to-peer nature of Bitcoin, an overwhelming majority of nodes use the official reference client [10] developed by a small group of people. This group makes the decision to implement changes to the protocol and most people accept these changes irrespective of their “correctness”. Some decisions caused heated discussions and even calls for boycott [11], which indicates that the community and the developers may disagree on some important points. It therefore seems logical to have a protocol with user-configurable and self-adjusting variables as a possible way to avoid these problems.
2.5 Bulky scripts
The scripting system in Bitcoin is a heavy and complex feature. It potentially allows one to create sophisticated transactions [12], but some of its features are disabled due to security concerns and some have never even been used [13]. The script (including both senders’ and receivers’ parts) for the most popular transaction in Bitcoin looks like this: OP DUP OP HASH160 OP EQUALVERIFY OP CHECKSIG. The script is 164 bytes long whereas its only purpose is to check if the receiver possess the secret key required to verify his signature.
Read the rest of the white paper here: https://cryptonote.org/whitepaper.pdf
submitted by xmrhaelan to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

A Reasonable Look at Litecoin Cash FUD

If there's one thing we can all agree on it's that the many echo chambers of the cryptosphere do nothing to help curb the parroting of unnecessary fear, uncertainty, and doubt spread by those who even might think they're doing some kind of service by it. Litecoin Cash is no exception to this rule, in fact they might even be more in the hot seat due to their controversial name and the timing of the fork. Let's take a look at some of the recent issues people keep bringing up and try to address them reasonably.
(Preface: I'm just someone who likes truth and due diligence, I have no affiliation with Litecoin Cash)
1) "Litecoin Cash is a scam!"
2) "There's only 1 exchange and it's locked! It's a scam!"
3) "The dev team is never around and never responds!"
  • Highly untrue, perhaps you are looking in the wrong places for information? There is a very lively and active Discord channel which you can find listed on the official website. Join it, and ask your questions there. The dev team is regularly in the chat rooms but more importantly THEY HAVE DEVELOPMENT WORK TO DO so most of their time will not be wasted answering your questions that are likely already in a FAQ or posted somewhere to be easily found with a smidgen of due diligence.
4) "There's a Reddit post showing a Binwalk where there's discrepancies between the released binaries and the Github repo."
  • Litecoincash (dev team member btw) has refuted this already on both Discord and Reddit trying to attempt to recreate the issue unsuccessfully and has invited the entire community to try to reproduce the apparent fault. So far, no one can, so before you go believing ONE SINGLE POST's bad news, maybe double check on things for yourself and don't spread unverified information.
5) "Why is Roger the Uniorn anonymous?"
  • He actually answered that in the Discord. His job is in financial sector and frankly his involvement in crypto could compromise his career. The man has a family to feed and bills to pay too. Chill out. Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? Answer that, scientist.
6) "NO WHITE PAPER!!!! IT'S A SCAM!!!"
  • Please send me a link to Litecoin's white paper :)
7) "They took the name of Litecoin to confuse people!"
  • I'm a total Litecoin fan, I admit, but what ever happened to healthy competition in a marketplace? I do agree a unique name is a better alternative but I also think the trolling of Bitcoin Cash with this name is rather hilarious and poignant to these times. Yes Bitcoin Cash is trying to subvert Bitcoin, but the Litecoin Cash team has been nothing but supportive of Litecoin since their launch and don't seem to be doing anything malicious against Litecoin's marketing or adoption. I'm sorry but if you cannot distinguish between the two and buy the wrong coin maybe you were moving a little too quickly and need to rethink your investment strategies.
UPDATE #1 - QUESTION ADDED - 02/23/2018 @ 12:55 PM EST
8) ecurrencyhodler brought up a very good point regarding network safety via mining malpractice in the comments:
Please don't omit the biggest weaknesses of this project. If LCC is profitable at all, it will get rekt by powerful sha-256 miners. Blocktimes will be ruined and tx's won't get processed.
I will be the first to admit I'm not personally qualified to answer mining related questions as I've not delved that deep into that end yet, but I did raise this question to Tanner, one of the dev team for LCC who is often available in the Discord server. He replied with:
The issue is, people aren't used to seeing effective difficulty adjustment on sha256 coins, so they tend to assume that like BTC, the network can't react very quickly to changes in hashpower (BTC only adjusts the mining difficulty every 2016 blocks). That's much more of a problem on sha256 coins without effective difficulty retargeting. LCC uses DarkGravity, the difficulty adjustment algorithm from Dash, which recalculates difficulty every block to respond to changes in hashpower.
I will certainly be looking more in depth into the DarkGravity algorithm myself as I further my education on mining but hopefully this answer can at least satisfy those who were worried about overpowered miners harming the integrity of the network. Dash seems pretty successful so far, so there's got to be some merit to it, right?
UPDATE #2 - QUESTION ADDED - 03/06/2018 @ 4:03 PM EST
9) "Yobit and the devs worked together in secret so they could all cash out the premined coins and win big!"
  • While it's a decent theory on paper it is provably untrue as 90% of the pre-mined coins are still sitting at their original wallet linked below. The 10% spent has been to go toward listing fees for future exchanges. (Hint: devs are smart people who wouldn't dare keep their valuable LTC coins on a shady exchange like Yobit haha)
  • View the dev's premine wallet on the block explorer
  • You'll notice it starts out with 5,500,000 LCC coins. There's been a few transactions since the original premine deposit leaving ~4,745,463 LCC coins in the wallet. The numerous in/out transactions are simply payments and change deposits (i.e. You own 10 LCC, you pay 1 LCC but you actually send 10 LCC and receive 9 LCC back automatically). So only ~754,536 pre-mined LCC coins have been spent/sold/traded/etc. Just saying if any one of us were going to dump our pre-mined coins we had and cash out on everyone, we'd certainly go for more than 10% haha!
Aside from these there are complaints of wallet issues and other such things but frankly that's on the user as many have shown already the wallet works quite successfully. I, myself, had issues getting everything to sync and scan properly but I simply asked for help in the Discord and Tanner, the lead dev, was kind enough to help me and lo and behold his advice was correct and I now have my coins safe and sound.
So there is some logic and calm arguments to refute a lot of this FUD being spread. I know a lot of people will still have issues with this post and that's fine, everyone is entitled to their own opinions but I've personally been involved in a number of coin forks and launches now and frankly this is one of the better ones with on time deliveries and plenty of communication.
Stay safe out there, always double check your sources of information (including me please) and just think twice before you act once. Much love crypto fam!
Oh and if you just want a place to dump your "useless garbage coin" I'll happily take them off your hands for you! Just send them here: CeNAjxEAja8hrdF1pzP4u3RHfStqhWYEyq (LCC)
submitted by auscoine to LCCofficial [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Profitability: How Long Does it Take to Mine One Bitcoin in 2019?

When it comes to Bitcoin (BTC) mining, the major questions on people’s minds are “how profitable is Bitcoin mining” and “how long would it take to mine one Bitcoin?” To answer these questions, we need to take an in-depth look at the current state of the Bitcoin mining industry — and how it has changed — over the last several years.
Bitcoin mining is, essentially, the process of participating in Bitcoin’s underlying security mechanism — known as proof-of-work — to help secure the Bitcoin blockchain. In return, participants receive compensation in bitcoins (BTC).
When you participate in Bitcoin mining, you are essentially searching for blocks by crunching complex cryptographic challenges using your mining hardware. Once a block is discovered, new transactions are recorded and verified within the block and the block discoverer receives the block rewards — currently set at 12.5 BTC — as well as the transactions fees for the transactions included within the block.
Once the maximum supply of 21 million Bitcoins has been mined, no further Bitcoins will ever come into existence. This property makes Bitcoin deflationary, something which many argue will inevitably increase the value of each Bitcoin unit as it becomes more scarce due to increased global adoption.
The limited supply of Bitcoin is also one of the reasons why Bitcoin mining has become so popular. In previous years, Bitcoin mining proved to be a lucrative investment option — netting miners with several fold returns on their investment with relatively little effort.
bitcoin mining hardware
Mining Hardware
The mining hardware you choose will mostly depend on your circumstances — in terms of budget, location and electricity costs. Since the amount of hashing power you can dedicate to the mining process is directly correlated with how much Bitcoin you will mine per day, it is wise to ensure your hardware is still competitive in 2019.
Bitcoin uses SHA256 as its mining algorithm. Because of this, only hardware compatible with this algorithm can be used to mine Bitcoin. Although it is technically possible to mine Bitcoin on your current computer hardware — using your CPU or GPU — this will almost certainly not generate a positive return on your investment and you may end up damaging your device.
The most cost-effective way to mine Bitcoin in 2019 is using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) mining hardware. These are specially-designed machines that offer much higher performance per watt than typical computers and have been an absolutely essential purchase for anybody looking to get into Bitcoin mining since the first Avalon ASICs were shipped in 2013.
When it comes to selecting Bitcoin mining hardware, there are several main parameters to consider — though the importance of each of these may vary based on personal circumstances and budget.
Performance per Watt
When it comes to Bitcoin mining, performance per watt is a measure of how many gigahashes per watt a machine is capable of and is, hence, a simple measure of its efficiency. Since electricity costs are likely to be one of the largest expenses when mining Bitcoin, it is usually a good idea to ensure that you are getting good performance per watt out of your hardware.
Ideally, your mining hardware would be highly efficient, allowing it to mine Bitcoin with lower energy requirements — though this will need to be balanced with acquisition costs, as often the most efficient hardware is also the most expensive. This means it may take longer to see a return on investment.
In countries with cheap electricity, performance per watt is often less of a concern than acquisition costs and price-performance ratio. In most countries, operating outdated mining hardware is typically cost prohibitive, as energy costs outweigh the income generated by the mining equipment.
However, this may not be the case for those operating in countries with extremely cheap electricity — such as Kuwait and Venezuela — as even older equipment can still be profitable. Similarly, miners with a free energy surplus, such as from wind or solar electric generators, can benefit from the minimal gains offered by still running outdated hardware.
Longevity
The lifetime of mining hardware also plays a critical role in determining how profitable your mining venture will be. It’s always a good idea to do whatever possible to ensure it runs as smoothly as possible.
Since mining equipment tends to run at a full (or almost full) load for extended periods, they also tend to break down and fail more frequently than most electronics — which can seriously damage your profitability. Equipment failure is even more common when purchasing second-hand equipment. Since warranty claims are often challenging, it can often take a long time to receive a warranty replacement.
Price-Performance Ratio
In many cases, one of the major criteria used to select mining hardware is the price-performance ratio — a measure of how much performance a machine outputs per unit price. In the case of cryptocurrency mining hardware, this is commonly expressed as gigahashes per dollar or GH/$.
Under ideal circumstances, the mining hardware would have a high price-performance ratio, ensuring you get a lot of bang for your buck. However, this must also be considered in combination with the acquisition costs and the expected lifetime of the machine — since the absolute most powerful machines are not always the cheapest or the most energy efficient.
Acquisition Costs
Acquisition costs are almost always the biggest barrier to entry for most Bitcoin miners since most top-end mining hardware costs several thousand dollars. This problem is further compounded by the fact that many hardware manufacturers offer discounts for bulk purchases, allowing those with deeper pockets to achieve a better price-performance ratio.
Acquisition costs include all the costs involved in purchasing any mining equipment, including hardware costs, shipping costs, import duties, and any further costs. For example, many ASIC miners do not include a power supply — which can be another considerable expense, since the 1,000W+ power supplies usually required tend to cost several hundred dollars alone.
Ensuring your equipment runs smoothly can also add in additional costs, such as cooling and maintenance expenses. In addition, some miners may want to invest in uninterruptible power supplies to ensure their hardware keeps running — even if the power fails temporarily.
asic mining
Current Generation Hardware
One of the most recent additions to the Bitcoin mining hardware market is the Ebang Ebit E11++, which was released in October 2018. Using a 10nm fabrication process for its processors, the Ebit E11++ is able to achieve one of the highest hash rates on the market at 44TH/s.
In terms of efficiency, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is arguably the best on the market, offering 44TH/s of hash rate while drawing just 1,980W of power, offering 22.2GH/W performance. However, as of writing, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is out of stock until March 31, 2019 — while its price of $2,024 (excluding shipping) may make it prohibitively expensive for those first getting involved with Bitcoin mining.
Another popular choice is the ASICminer 8 Nano, a machine released in October 2018 that offers 44TH/s for $3,900 excluding shipping. The ASICminer 8 Nano draws 2,100W of power, giving it an efficiency of almost 21GH/W — slightly lower than the Ebit E11++ while costing almost double the price. However, unlike the E11++, the 8 Nano is actually in stock and available to purchase.
ASICminer also offers the 8 Nano Pro, a machine launched in mid-2018 that offers 80 TH/s of hash rate for $9,500 (excluding shipping). However, unlike the Ebit E11++ and 8 Nano, the minimum order quantity for the 8 Nano Pro is curiously set at five, meaning you will need to lay out a minimum of $47,500 in order to actually get your hands on one (or five).
While the 8 Nano Pro doesn’t offer the same performance per watt as the Ebit E11+ or AICMiner 8 Nano, it is one of the quieter miners on this list, making it more suitable for a home or office environment. That being said, the ASICminer 8 Nano Pro is easily the most expensive miner per TH on this list — costing a whopping $118.75/TH, compared to the $46/TH offered by the E11++ and $88.64 offered by the 8 Nano.
The latest hardware on this list is the Innosilicon T3 43T, which is currently available for pre-order at $2,279, and estimated to ship in March 2019. Offering 43TH/s of performance at 2,100W, the T3 43T comes in at an efficiency of 20.4GH/W, which is around 10 percent less energy efficient than the Ebit E11++.
The T3 43T also has a minimum order quantity of three units, making the minimum acquisition cost $6837 + shipping for preorders. All in all, the T3 43T is more costly and less efficient than the E11++ but may arrive slightly earlier since Ebang will not ship the E11++ units until at least end March 29, 2019.
Finally, this list would not be complete without including Bitmain’s latest offering, the Antminer S15-28TH/s, which — as its name suggests — offers 28TH/s of hash power while drawing just under 1600W at the wall. The Antminer S15 is one of the only SHA256 miners to use 7nm processors, making it somewhat smaller than some of the other devices on this list.
Like most pieces of top-end Bitcoin mining hardware, the Antminer S15 27TH/s model is currently sold out, with current orders not shipping until mid-February 2019. However, the S15 is offered at a significantly lower price than many of its competitors at just $1020 (excluding shipping), with no minimum quantity restriction. At these rates, the Antminer comes in at just $37.78/TH — though its energy efficiency is a much less impressive 17.5GH/W.
Mining Hardware Mining Hardware Comparison
Performance (GH/W) Price Performance Ratio ($/TH)
Ebang Ebit E11++ 22.2GH/W $46/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano 21GH/W $88.64/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano Pro 19GH/W $118.75/TH
Innosilicon T3 43T 20.4GH/W $53/TH
Antminer S15-28TH/s 17.5GH/W $37.78/TH
How To Select a Good Mining Pool
Mining pools are platforms that allow miners to pool their resources together to achieve a higher collective hash rate — which, in turn, allows the collective to mine more blocks than they would be able to achieve alone.
Typically, these mining pools will distribute block rewards to contributing miners based on the proportion of the hash rate they supply. If a pool contributing a total of 20 TH/s of hash rate successfully mines the next block, a user responsible for 10 percent of this hash rate will receive 10 percent of the 12.5 BTC reward.
Pools essentially allow smaller miners to compete with large private mining organizations by ensuring that the collective hash rate is high enough to successfully mine blocks on regular basis. Without operating through a mining pool, many miners would be unlikely to discover any blocks at all — due to only contributing a tiny fraction of the overall Bitcoin hash rate.
While it is quite possible to be successful mining without a pool, this typically requires an extremely large mining operation and is usually not recommended — unless you have enough hash rate to mine blocks on a regular basis.
Although it is technically possible to discover blocks mining solo and keep the entire 12.5 BTC reward for yourself, the odds of this actually occurring are practically zero — making pool collaboration practically the only way to compete in 2019 and beyond.
Selecting the best pool for you can be a challenging job since the vast majority of pools are quite similar and offer similar features and comparable fees. Because of this, we have broken down the qualities you should be looking for in a new pool into four categories; reputation, hash rate, pool fees, and usability/features:
Reputation
The reputation of a pool is one of the most important factors in selecting the pool that is best for you. Well-reputed pools will tend to be much larger than newer or less well-established pools since few pools with a poor reputation can stand the test of time.
Well-reputed pools also tend to be more transparent about their operation, many of which provide tools to ensure that each user is getting the correct reward based on the hash rate contributed. By using only pools with a great reputation, you also ensure your hash rate is not being used for nefarious purposes — such as powering a 51 percent attack.
When comparing a list of pools that appear suitable for you, it is a wise move to read their user reviews before making your choice — ensuring you don’t end up mining at a pool that steals your hard-fought earnings.
Hash Rate
When it comes to mining Bitcoin, the probability of discovering the next block is directly related to the amount of hashing power you contribute to the network. Because of this, one of the major features you should be considering when selecting your pool is its total hash rate — which is often closely related to the proportion of new blocks mined by the pool
Since the total hash rate of a pool is directly related to how quickly it discovers new blocks, this means the largest pools tend to discover a relative majority of blocks — leading to more regular rewards. However, the very largest pools also tend the have higher fees but often make up for this with sheer success and additional features.
Sometimes, some of the largest pools have a minimum hash rate requirement ù leaving some of the smaller miners left out of the loop. Although smaller pools typically have more relaxed requirements with reduced performance thresholds, these pools may be only slightly more profitable than mining solo.
Pool Fees
When choosing a suitable pool, typically one of the major considerations is its fees. Typically, most pools will charge a small fee that is deducted from your earnings and is usually around 1-2 percent — but sometimes slightly lower or higher.
There are also pools that offer 0 percent fees. However, these are often much smaller than the major pools and tend to make their money in a different way — such as through monthly subscriptions or donations.
Ideally, you will choose the pool that offers the best balance of fees to other features. Usually, the pool with the absolute lowest fees is not the best choice. Additionally, pools with the lowest fees often have the highest withdrawal minimums — making pool hopping uneconomical for most.
Usability and Features
When first starting out with Bitcoin mining, learning how to set up a pool and navigating through the settings can be a challenge. Because of this, several pools target their services to newer users by offering a simple to navigate user interface and providing detailed learning resources and prompt customer support.
However, for more experienced miners, simple pools don’t tend to offer a variety of features needed to maximize profitability. For example, although many mining pools focus their entire hash rate towards mining a single cryptocurrency, some are large enough to offer additional options — allowing users to mine other SHA256 coins such as Bitcoin Cash (BCH) or Fantom if they choose.
These pools are technically more challenging to use and mostly designed for those familiar with mining, happy to hop from coin to coin mining whichever is most profitable at the time. There are even some exchanges that automatically direct their combined hash rate at the most profitable cryptocurrency — taking the guesswork out of the equation.
bitcoin mining pool
Best Mining Pools for 2019
The Bitcoin mining pool industry has a large number of players, but the vast majority of the Bitcoin hash rate is concentrated within just a few pools. Currently, there are dozens of suitable pools to choose from — but we have selected just a few of the best to help get you started on your journey.
Slushpool was the first Bitcoin mining pool released, being launched way back in 2010 under the name “Bitcoin Pooled Mining Server.” Since then, Slushpool has grown into one of the most popular pools around — currently accounting for just under 10 percent of the total Bitcoin hash rate.
Although Slushpool isn’t one of the very largest pools, it does offer a newbie-friendly interface alongside more advanced features for those that need them. The pool has moderately high fees of 2 percent but offers servers in several countries — including the U.S., Europe, China, and Japan — giving it a good balance of fees to features.
BTC.com is another potential candidate for your pool and currently stands as the largest public Bitcoin mining pool. It is responsible for mining around 17 percent of new blocks. Being the largest public mining pool provides users with a sense of security, ensuring blocks are mined regularly and a stable income is made.
Image courtesy of Blockchain.info.
BTC.com is owned by Bitmain, a company that manufacturers mining hardware, and charges a 1.5 percent fees — placing it squarely in the middle-tier in terms of fees. Unlike other platforms, BTC.com uses its own payment structure known as FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), which means miners also receive a share of the transaction fees included within mined blocks — making it slightly more profitable than standard payment per share (PPS) pools.
Another great option is Antpool, a mining pool that supports mining services for 10 different cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, Litecoin (LTC) and Ethereum (ETH). AntPool frequently trades places with BTC.com as the largest Bitcoin mining pool. However, as of this writing, it occupies the title of the third-largest public mining pool.
What sets Antpool apart from other pools is the ability to choose your own fee system — including PPS, PPS+, and PPLNS. If you choose PPLNS, using Antpool is free but you will not receive any transaction fees from any blocks mined. Antpool also offers regular payouts and has a low minimum payout of just 0.001 BTC, making it suitable for smaller miners.
Last on the list of the best Bitcoin mining pools in 2019 is the Bitcoin.com mining pool. Although this is one of the smaller pools available, the Bitcoin.com pool has some redeeming features that make it worth a look. It offers mining contracts, allowing you to test out Bitcoin mining before investing in mining equipment of your own. According to Bitcoin.com, they are the highest paying Pay Per Share (PPS) pool in the world, offering up to 98 percent block rewards as well as automatic switching between BTC and BCH mining to optimize profitability.

Electricity Costs
While your mining hardware is most important when it comes to how much BTC you can earn when mining, your electricity costs are usually the largest additional expense. With electricity costs often varying dramatically between countries, ensuring you are on the best cost-per-KWh plan available will help to keep costs down when mining.
Most commonly, large mining operations will be set up in countries where electricity costs are the lowest — such as Iceland, India, and Ukraine. Since China has one of the lowest energy costs in the world, it was previously the epicenter of Bitcoin mining. However, since the government began cracking down on cryptocurrencies, it has largely fallen out of favor with miners.
Technically, Venezuela is one of the cheapest countries in the world in terms of electricity, with the government heavily subsidizing these energy costs — while Bitcoin offers an escape from the hyperinflation suffered by the Venezuelan bolivar. Despite this, importing mining hardware into the country is a costly endeavor, making it impractical for many people.
Finding ways to lower your electricity costs is one of the best ways to improve your mining profitability. This can include investing in renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, or wind — which can yield increased profitability over the long term.
if you are looking to buy bitcoin mining equipment here is some links:

Model Antminer S17 Pro (56Th) from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 56Th/s for a power consumption of 2385W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s17-pro-56th-copy/?wpam_id=17
Model Antminer S9K from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 14Th/s for a power consumption of 1323W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s9k-14-th-s/?wpam_id=17
Model T2T 30Tfrom Innosilicon mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 30Th/s for a power consumption of 2200W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/innosilicon-t2t-30t/?wpam_id=17
mining wholesale website:
https://miningwholesale.eu/?wpam_id=17
submitted by mohamadk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Network Security & Whether to ProgPow

While listening to the Core Devs Meeting #54 this morning, I realized that the factual trade-offs around ProgPow need to be better defined so that we can truly hear the community's take on this issue. It is a lot to put on the core team, and everyone seems to want more participation in this debate. An audit of ProgPow is necessary, but it will not lead to a decision on whether to implement it or not. In talking about the trade-offs of ProgPow until the end of such audit, let's just assume it works as expected.
I'll start by saying that it has been extremely difficult and frustrating for me to understand the tradeoffs of ProgPow, despite being actively involved in the community. I can only imagine how difficult it might be for the average ETH stakeholder to have an opinion on whether ProgPow is a good idea or not.
The conspiracy theories that have surfaced around ProgPow have certainly not contributed to the debate, and I'd like to take this opportunity to focus on facts, not speculation.
If you just tuned in, a good place to start is the question what is ProgPow?
ELI15: ProgPow is a module based on CUDA to better parallelize specific functions of Ethash on Nvidia architectures and increase computational efficiency. My back-of-the-envelope math shows that, under ProgPow, GPUs mining ProgPow-Ethash would be 1.5x more efficient than Plain-Ethash. Also, ProgPow allows the algorithm's parameters to be programmatically changed to prevent an integrated circuit (in an ASIC) to have an edge on efficiency over commodity GPUs in the long-run.
ELI5: ProgPow makes GPUs more efficient and allows Ethash to change in a way that curbs the advantage ASICs have over GPUs in the long-run.
The issue(?) of decreased hashing power
EF Security Lead Martin Swende said in the call today that he expects ProgPow to cut difficulty in half, which would in turn lead to lower hashing power being allocated to the network. Since Plain-Ethash would have different parameters than ProgPow-Ethash, their hashrates are not comparable in terms of security. Think of Plain-Ethash and ProgPow-Ethash as different algorithms. Still, all else equal, a 50% decrease in difficulty "doesn't sound too good" as u/Souptacular put it in the call today. That is because, even though hashrates are not comparable, the aggregate amount of electricity required to potentially attack the network is decreased, meaning, the cost of an attack might be lower post-ProgPow. However, I also recognize that there are social factors that also need to be considered in the decision of implementing ProgPow.
Based on my conversations, hobbyist miners have a love/hate relationship with Ethereum.
Ethash's hardness to ASIC has brought to Ethereum a lot of individual miners and small operations who, through mining pools, contribute to a large amount of the current hashrate. Competition with larger operations is lower on Ethereum than say, Zcash, given the much decreased efficiency gains when using ASICs on Ethash. This is the "love" in the sentence above. The "hate" is the realization that the network will eventually adopt PoS and that, until then, block rewards will continue to decrease. This is painful, especially at current price levels. This coalition of smaller operations believes that the adoption of ProgPow would level the playing field even further and make mining Ethash more fair. Not adopting ProgPow may lead this coalition of retail miners to leave Ethereum. This is may be the main reason why large mining pools like Ethermine are pro-ProgPow. The worst-outcome-possible would be for these miners to fork their coalition out of the protocol.
The issue of ASIC centralization
Another argument pro-ProgPow that keeps popping up is that ASICs contribute to centralization, which has been an ongoing problem for Bitcoin and many other protocols that employ algorithms that are not as hard as Ethash. u/vbuterin has said in the past that he does not believe mining centralization concerns are as relevant to Ethash as other algos. And after surveying the Ethash ASIC market, I tend agree with him. It all seems to comes down to efficiency and the degree of centralization in the ASIC manufacturing industry. Ethash ASICs are only 2x more efficient than state-of-the-art GPUs; a much lower efficiency coefficient than SHA-256 ASICs, which are 1000x more efficient. There are now eleven different models of Ethash ASICs in the market, and three fiercely competitive manufacturers producing them (BITMAIN, Innosillicon and PandaMiner). Had BITMAIN been the only entity in the Ethash ASIC market, I would be more concerned about centralization, but that does not seem to be the case. Ultimately, we should remember that ProgPow does not eliminate existing ASICs from the market - it only makes existing GPUs more efficient on a relative basis. Also, the activation of ProgPow would not prevent these manufacturers from developing a ProgPow-compatible ASIC.
The most important factor to consider right now is network security.
Even more so because the PoW chain will be an integral component of the first stages of the new Serenity roadmap. PoS validators stake their funds on the PoW chain and, as such, the entire system relies on a sufficiently large number of miners to not abandon Ethereum. From my understanding, due to the use of Nvidia's CUDA, GPU miners running RX580s and RX Vegas (which are based on AMD) would not be able to mine ProgPow (please fact-check if I'm wrong). We don't know the proportion of miners running AMD versus Nvidia versus ASICs.
Core developers are focusing on whether ProgPow does what it is supposed to do, hence the focus on an audit, but that might not be the right question. The way I see it, the right question should be (assuming ProgPow works): in what scenario will network security be optimized in terms of cumulative electricity expenditure allocated to Ethash?
u/5chdn
submitted by jamesmrk3l to ethereum [link] [comments]

How do I mine Dogecoin?

How do I mine Dogecoin?
Let’s take a lucky guess that you’re here today because you’ve heard a lot about cryptocurrencies and you want to get involved, right? If you’re a community person, Dogecoin mining might be the perfect start for you!
Bitcoin was the first in 2009, and now there are hundreds of cryptocurrencies. These new coins (that operate on their own native blockchain) are called altcoins or alternative coins. One popular altcoin is Dogecoin. It can be bought, sold and traded, just like Bitcoin. It can also be mined!
So, what is Dogecoin mining?
You’ll know what hardware and what software you need to get started. You’ll also know whether or not Dogecoin mining is for you!
So, where would you like to start? The beginning? Great choice. Let’s have a quick look at how Dogecoin got started.
A (Very) Short History of Dogecoin
In 2013, an Australian named Jackson Palmer and an American named Billy Markus became friends. They became friends because they both liked cryptocurrencies. However, they also thought the whole thing was getting too serious so they decided to create their own.
Palmer and Markus wanted their coin to be more fun and more friendly than other crypto coins. They wanted people who wouldn’t normally care about crypto to get involved.
They decided to use a popular meme as their mascot — a Shiba Inu dog.

https://preview.redd.it/rymnyyz1iil31.png?width=303&format=png&auto=webp&s=f138e3fe56eef9c6b0e7f49b84fefc41fb83e5aa
Dogecoin was launched on December 6th, 2013. Since then it has become popular because it’s playful and good-natured. Just like its mascot!
Dogecoin has become well-known for its use in charitable acts and online tipping. In 2014, $50,000 worth of Dogecoin was donated to the Jamaican Bobsled Team so they could go to the Olympics. Dogecoin has also been used to build wells in Kenya. Isn’t that awesome!
Users of social platforms – like Reddit – can use Dogecoin to tip or reward each other for posting good content.
Dogecoin has the 27th largest market cap of any cryptocurrency.
Note: A market cap (or market capitalization) is the total value of all coins on the market.
So, Dogecoin is a popular altcoin, known for being fun, friendly and kind. It’s a coin with a dog on it! You love it already, don’t you?
Next, I want to talk about how mining works…
What is Mining?
To understand mining, you first need to understand how cryptocurrencies work. Cryptocurrencies are peer-to-peer digital currencies. This means that they allow money to be transferred from one person to another without using a bank.
Every cryptocurrency transaction is recorded on a huge digital database called a blockchain. The database is stored across thousands of computers called nodes. Nodes put together groups of new transactions and add them to the blockchain. These groups are called blocks.
Each block of transactions has to be checked by all the nodes on the network before being added to the blockchain. If nodes didn’t check transactions, people could pretend that they have more money than they really do (I know I would!).
Confirming transactions (mining) requires a lot of computer power and electricity so it’s quite expensive.
Blockchains don’t have paid employees like banks, so they offer a reward to users who confirm transactions. The reward for confirming new transactions is new cryptocurrency. The process of being rewarded with new currency for confirming transactions is what we call “mining”!

https://preview.redd.it/rcut2jx3iil31.png?width=598&format=png&auto=webp&s=8d78d41c764f4fe4e6386da4f40a66556a873b87
It is called mining because it’s a bit like digging for gold or diamonds. Instead of digging with a shovel for gold, you’re digging with your computer for crypto coins!
Each cryptocurrency has its own blockchain. Different ways of mining new currency are used by different coins where different rewards are offered.
So, how do you mine Dogecoin? What’s special about Dogecoin mining? Let’s see…
What is Dogecoin Mining?
Dogecoin mining is the process of being rewarded with new Dogecoin for checking transactions on the Dogecoin blockchain. Simple, right? Well no, it’s not quite that simple, nothing ever is!
Mining Dogecoin is like a lottery. To play the lottery you have to do some work. Well, actually your computer (or node) has to do some work! This work involves the confirming and checking of transactions which I talked about in the last section.
Lots of computers work on the same block of transactions at the same time but the only one can win the reward of new coins. The one that earns the new coins is the node that adds the new block of transactions to the old block of transactions. This is completed using complex mathematical equations.
The node that solves the mathematical problem first wins! It can then attach the newly confirmed block of transactions to the rest of the blockchain.
Most cryptocurrency mining happens this way. However, Dogecoin mining differs from other coins in several important areas. These areas are;
  • Algorithm: Each cryptocurrency has a set of rules for mining new currency. These rules are called a mining or hashing algorithm.
  • Block Time: This is the average length of time it takes for a new block of transactions to be checked and added to the blockchain.
  • Difficulty: This is a number that represents how hard it is to mine each new block of currency. You can use the difficulty number to work out how likely you are to win the mining lottery. Mining difficulty can go up or down depending on how many miners there are. The difficulty is also adjusted by the coin’s protocol to make sure that the block time stays the same.
  • Reward: This is the amount of new currency that is awarded to the miner of each new block.
Now, let’s compare how DogeCoin mining works compared to Litecoin and Bitcoin…
Mining Comparison
Bitcoin uses SHA-256 to guide the mining of new currency and the other two use Scrypt. This is an important difference because Scrypt mining needs a lot less power and is a lot quicker than SHA-256. This makes mining easier for miners with less powerful computers. Fans of Litecoin and Dogecoin think that they are fairer than Bitcoin because more people can mine them.
Note: In 2014, Litecoin and Dogecoin merged mining. This means they made it possible to mine both coins in the same process. Dogecoin mining is now linked with Litecoin mining. It’s like two different football teams playing home games in the same stadium!
Mining Dogecoin is a lot faster than mining Litecoin or Bitcoin. The block reward is much higher too!
Don’t get too excited though (sorry!). Dogecoin is still worth a lot less than Bitcoin and Litecoin. A reward of ten thousand Dogecoin is worth less than thirty US Dollars. A reward of 12.5 Bitcoin is currently worth 86,391.63 US Dollars!
However, it’s not as bad as it sounds. Dogecoin mining difficulty is more than one million times less than Bitcoin mining difficulty. This means you are much more likely to win the block reward when you mine Dogecoin.
Now I’ve told you about what Dogecoin mining is and how it works, would you like to give it a try?
Let’s see what you need to do to become a Dogecoin miner…
How to Mine Dogecoin
There are two ways to mine Dogecoin, solo (by yourself) or in a Dogecoin mining pool.
Note: A Dogecoin pool is a group of users who share their computing power to increase the odds of winning the race to confirm transactions. When one of the nodes in a pool confirms a transaction, it divides the reward between the users of the pool equally.
Dogecoin Mining: Solo vs Pool
When you mine as a part of a Dogecoin pool, you have to pay fees. Also, when the pool mines a block you will only receive a small portion of the total reward. However, pools mine blocks much more often than solo miners. So, your chance of earning a reward (even though it is shared) is increased. This can provide you with a steady new supply of Dogecoin.
If you choose to mine solo then you risk waiting a long time to confirm a transaction because there is a lot of competition. It could be weeks or even months before you mine your first block! However, when you do win, the whole reward will be yours. You won’t have to share it or pay any fees.
As a beginner, I would recommend joining a Dogecoin pool. This way you won’t have to wait as long to mine your first block of new currency. You’ll also feel like you’re part of the community and that’s what Dogecoin is all about!
What You Need To Start Mining Dogecoin
Before you start Dogecoin mining, you’ll need a few basics. They are;
  • A PC with either Windows, OS X or Linux operating system.
  • An internet connection
  • A Shiba Inu puppy (just kidding!)
You’ll also need somewhere to keep the Dogecoin you mine. Go to Dogecoin’s homepage and download a wallet.
Note: A wallet is like an email account. It has a public address for sending/receiving Dogecoin and a private key to access them. Your private keys are like your email’s password. Private keys are very important and need to be kept completely secure.
There are two different types; a light wallet and a full wallet. To mine Dogecoin, you’ll need the full wallet. It’s called Dogecoin Core.
Now that you’ve got a wallet, you need some software and hardware.
Dogecoin Mining Hardware
You can mine Dogecoin with;
  • Your PC’s CPU: The CPU in your PC is probably powerful enough to mine Dogecoin. However, it is not recommended. Mining can cause less powerful computers to overheat which causes damage.
  • A GPU: GPUs (or graphics cards) are used to improve computer graphics but they can also be used to mine Dogecoin. There are plenty of GPUs to choose from but here are a few to get you started;SAPPHIRE Pulse Radeon RX 580 ($426.98)Nvidia GeForce GTX ($579.99)ASUS RX Vega 64 ($944.90)
  • A Scrypt ASIC Miner: This is a piece of hardware designed to do one job only. Scrypt ASIC miners are programmed to mine scrypt based currencies like Litecoin and Dogecoin. ASIC miners are very powerful. They are also very expensive, very loud and can get very hot! Here’s a few for you to check out;Innosilicon A2 Terminator ($760)Bitmain Antminer L3 ($1,649)BW L21 Scrypt Miner ($7,700)
Dogecoin Mining Software
Whether you’re mining with an ASIC, a GPU or a CPU, you’ll need some software to go with it. You should try to use the software that works best with the hardware you’re using. Here’s a short list of the best free software for each choice of mining hardware;
  • CPU: If you just want to give mining a quick try, using your computer’s CPU will work fine. The only software I would recommend for mining using a CPU only is CPU miner which you can download for free here.
  • GPU: If you mine with a GPU there are more software options. Here are a few to check out;CudaMiner– Works best with Nvidia products.CGminer– Works with most GPU hardware.EasyMiner– User-friendly, so it’s good for beginners.
  • Scrypt ASIC miner:MultiMiner– Great for mining scrypt based currencies like Litecoin and Dogecoin. It can also be used to mine SHA-256 currencies like Bitcoin.CGminer and EasyMiner can also be used with ASIC miners.
Recommendations
You’re a beginner, so keep it simple! When you first start mining Dogecoin I would recommend using a GPU like the Radeon RX 580 with EasyMiner software. Then I would recommend joining a Dogecoin mining pool. The best pools to join are multi-currency pools like Multipool or AikaPool.
If you want to mine Dogecoin but don’t want to invest in all the tech, there is one other option…
Dogecoin Cloud Mining
Cloud mining is mining without mining! Put simply, you rent computer power from a huge data center for a monthly or yearly fee. The Dogecoin is mined at the center and then your share is sent to you.
All you need to cloud mine Dogecoin is a Dogecoin wallet. Then choose a cloud mining pool to join. Eobot, Nice Hash and Genesis Mining all offer Scrypt-based cloud mining for a monthly fee.
There are pros and cons to Dogecoin cloud mining;
The Pros
  • It’s cheaper than setting up your own mining operation. There’s also no hot, noisy hardware lying around the house!
  • As a beginner, there isn’t a lot of technical stuff to think about.
  • You get a steady supply of new currency every month.
The Cons
  • Cloud mining pools don’t share much information about themselves and how they work. It can be hard to work out if a cloud mining contract is a good value for money.
  • You are only renting computer power. If the price of Dogecoin goes down, you will still have to pay the same amount for something that is worthless.
  • Dogecoin pools have fixed contracts. The world of crypto can change very quickly. You could be stuck with an unprofitable contract for two years!
  • It’s no fun letting someone else do the mining for you!
Now you know about all the different ways to mine Dogecoin we can ask the big question, can you make tons of money mining Dogecoin?
So, Is Dogecoin Mining Profitable?
The short answer is, not really. Dogecoin mining is not going to make you a crypto billionaire overnight. One Dogecoin is worth 0.002777 US Dollars. If you choose to mine Dogecoin solo, it will be difficult to make a profit. You will probably spend more money on electricity and hardware than you will make from Dogecoin mining. Even if you choose a Dogecoin pool or a cloud pool your profits will be small.
However, if you think I am telling you to not mine Dogecoin, then you’re WRONG! Of course, I think you should mine Dogecoin!
But why? Seriously…
Well, you should mine Dogecoin because it’s fun and you want to be a part of the Dogecoin family. Cryptocurrency is going to change the world and you want to be part of that change, right? Mining Dogecoin is a great way to get involved.
Dogecoin is the coin that puts a smile on people’s faces. By mining Dogecoin you’ll be supporting all the good work its community does. You’ll learn about mining from the friendliest gang in crypto. And who knows? In a few years, the Dogecoin you mine now could be worth thousands or even millions! In 2010, Bitcoin was worthless. Think about that!
Only you can choose whether to mine Dogecoin or not. You now know everything you need to know to make your choice. The future is here. So, what are you going to do?
submitted by alifkhalil469 to BtcNewz [link] [comments]

Transcript of Open Developer Meeting In Discord - 5/10/2019

[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Channel should be open now
Chill05/10/2019
you all rock!
just getting that out of the way :wink:
Tron05/10/2019
Cheers everyone.
theking05/10/2019
Hi fabulous dev team!
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
Howdy!
Tron05/10/2019
No specific agenda today.
Questions?
Has everyone seen Zelcore wallet, and Spend app?
theDopeMedic05/10/2019
Any major development status updates that haven't been listed in #news?
Synicide05/10/2019
How was the meetup yesterday? I heard it would be recorded, it is uploaded anywhere yet?
Tron05/10/2019
And Trezor support on Mango Farm assets?
@Synicide Yes it was recorded. The Bitcoin meetup organizer has the video.
I talked about Ravencoin, but mostly about the stuff that was being built on/with/for Ravencoin.
There was about 70% overlap with folks who were at the Ravencoin meetup in March.
Synicide05/10/2019
awesome, looking forward to watching it when it's available
Tron05/10/2019
I'll hit up James and see if he's posting the video.
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
@theDopeMedic I'd follow github if youre interested in development status
Synicide05/10/2019
zelcore looks super slick. Been meaning to research its security more with the username/pw being stored on device
Chill05/10/2019
How is the progress on the restricted assets and testnet coming along? A secondary question would be about the approximate fork timeframe.
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Has anyone heard from the community dev (BW) working on Dividends?
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Any word on BW and his progress w dividends?
@S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org LOL
Tron05/10/2019
@S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org Great question. I haven't heard.
Synicide05/10/2019
last meeting BlondFrogs said he would try to connect with BW as he was sick with the flu at the time. Maybe he has an update
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
I've tried to get in contact, but with no success.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Got a funny feeling...
Jeroz05/10/2019
Last time we left off with someone mentioning a foundation and Tron saying let’s discuss that next time iirc
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Has anyone taken a look at the merits for this proposal? Thoughts? https://medium.com/systems-nexus/modified-x16r-algorithm-proposal-for-constant-hash-rate-in-short-time-164711dd9044
Medium
Modified X16R algorithm proposal for constant hash rate in short time
Interpretation Lens V. a0.01
Tron05/10/2019
I did see it. Does anyone think this is a problem?
Synicide05/10/2019
It looks interesting... but I'm not sure what it is trying to solve. Looking at netstats, our 1 hour average block time is perfectly 1 minute
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Last I heard from him he expressed how important finishing the code was. I wouldnt jump to conclusions on his absence within the community.
Synicide05/10/2019
x16r by nature will fluctuate, but DGW seems to be doing a good job keeping consistent block times
Tron05/10/2019
Because of relatively broad distribution across the algorithms, the block times are fairly consistent. It is possible, but very, very unlikely to get a sequence that takes up to 4x longer, but that's super rare, and only 4 minutes.
We did some timing analysis of the algorithms early on. A few are 1/2 as long as SHA-256 and some are up to 4x longer. But when you randomly select 16 it usually comes out about even.
Synicide05/10/2019
1hr avg: 1.02min - 24hr avg: 1min
I think we should focus on building, and not trying to fix what isnt necessarily broken
Tron05/10/2019
Agreed.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Agreed
Tron05/10/2019
Is everyone ok with the frequency (every other week) of this discussion?
Jeroz05/10/2019
(Added thumbs down to measure)
Tron05/10/2019
@Jeroz Did you do thumbs-up and thumbs down?
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Seems appropriate. Its not like the devs dont poke around here and chat anyways.
Tron05/10/2019
Anything critical that we should be aware of?
Jeroz05/10/2019
When I need a dev, I poke a dev. When that dev is unavailable. I poke another one :smiley:
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
BlondFrogs was testing some github code last month to create a dividends snapshot database of asset holders at a given blockheight. Is that planned for inclusion? That's the only thing needed for dividends.
Jeroz05/10/2019
I hope I didn’t offend any devs
With poking around
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Was thinking voting would be an excellent use case for restricted assets. Local communities, nations, etc... could kyc their residents
radiodub05/10/2019
Is x16r will remain fpga mineable
Tron05/10/2019
@Jeroz We're hard to offend.
Chill05/10/2019
Is the general dev feeling that the next fork should and will include everything needed for the next 6-9 months (barring something completely unforeseen)?
Jeroz05/10/2019
I know :smile:
Tron05/10/2019
@radiodub Nearly impossible to stop FPGAs and still keep GPUs
Jeroz05/10/2019
About that: voting is another hard fork right? Not too soon?
Tron05/10/2019
FPGAs can be reprogrammed as fast. It is silicon (true ASIC) that we can obsolete with a tiny change.
@Jeroz Messaging, voting, Tags, Restricted Assets would require a hard fork (upgrade).
We could do them each individually, but folks get weary of upgrades, so current plan is to roll them together into one.
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Good idea
Jeroz05/10/2019
Oh voting too?
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
People will like that
Jeroz05/10/2019
I thought that was coming later
Tron05/10/2019
Voting is the one that isn't being worked on now. Tags and Restricted assets have taken precedence.
Jeroz05/10/2019
I know. But you plan on waiting to fork until voting is also done?
That would have my preference tbh
But I can see an issue with too many things at the same time
Tron05/10/2019
If someone wants to step in, we've had one of our devs sidelined and he was working on BlockBook support so more light wallets can connect to Ravencoin. Mostly test cases needed at this point.
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Thats a pretty large upgrade.. Bigger surface for unknowns
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
At what point would RVN community consider moving to ASICs because having a Bitcoin level of security would eventually be needed?
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Never rikki
Tron05/10/2019
@S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org 100% Lots of testing on testnet and bounties.
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
I am here :smiley:
Tron05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor There's nothing inherently wrong with ASICs but it tends to centralize to data centers and less opportunity for anyone to just run their gaming rig overnight and collect RVN.
Welcome Blondfrogs
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Asics are too expensive. If we want normal people to mine, then we cant be an asic network
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@Tron True but what happens when the chain needs a Bitcoin level of protection?
Tron05/10/2019
More GPUs, more FPGAs
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Nvidia loves ravencoin :stuck_out_tongue:
Chill05/10/2019
ok, so we are pro FPGAs
𝕿𝖍𝖊 𝕯𝖔𝖓 𝕳𝖆𝖗𝖎𝖘𝖙𝖔 CEO ∞05/10/2019
Build it and they will come
Tron05/10/2019
It's all relative. It is cost to attack. If an ASIC isn't available for rent, then only option is rental of non-allocated GPUs
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@Chill Eventually everyone will need FPGAs to be profitable on RVN, at that point I don't see why we just don't make the switch to ASICs
Tron05/10/2019
Also, as much as we don't focus on price, the price does matter because it determines the amount of electricity and hardware will be deployed to get the block reward. Price increase means more security, more mining means more security means higher price.
It's a circle.
Chill05/10/2019
someone tell that to the twitter handler
HailKira05/10/2019
you guys adding seedphrase to desktop wallet?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
@HailKira We will, just is not a high priority right now.
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Twitter handle wants rvn ded
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
I just don't see much difference between ASIC and FPGA and I'd rather have the added nethash an ASIC will provide once GPUs are virtually kicked off the network
kryptoshi05/10/2019
I'm at 11 GB future proof
Tron05/10/2019
That also limits miners to big money, not gaming rigs.
Synicide05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor you have to keep in mind the 'added nethash' is all relative
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
FPGAs will limit miners to big $$$ too IMO
Tron05/10/2019
@kryptoshi New algo x16r-12G requires 12GB :frowning:
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
But sperating smaller gb cards would lead to less adoption if we ever become a mainstream coin.
Adpotion of mining that is
Chill05/10/2019
but we are a mainstream coin
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Mains stream as in what eth did
Tron05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor I agree. Not a perfect solution.
Steelers05/10/2019
Is this a Dev meeting or Algo meeting :smiley:
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
But if we ever go mem lane. We should aim for 6 or 8gb.
Tron05/10/2019
Open to other questions.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@Tron Probably not the time and the place to have this discussion as we stand currently but IMO we're gonna have this conversation for real eventually
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Most cards have 6gb now.
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Why 12 gb ? Such a massive jump
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
^
Would also like to know
Tron05/10/2019
@kryptoshi I was joking. You said you had 11GB card.
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Haha
You got em good
I cant imaghine the face he had when he was 1gb short
Lel
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
That's what she said
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Hahaha
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
need a 2080ti
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
How much does the VII have?
16?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Any other questions you have for us?
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
@[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs You were testing some github code last month to create a dividends snapshot database of asset holders at a given blockheight. Is that planned for inclusion? That's the only thing needed for dividends.
Chill05/10/2019
a dev might want to contact Crypto Chico for some 'splaining
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
I still haven't contacted the developer that was working on dividends. Was pretty busy with some other stuff. I will contact him this next week, and see where we are at for that.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Chico doesn't do interviews, shame. Tron would be a much needed interview for his community
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
As far as releasing dividends, I can be released at anytime the code is finished and doesn't require any voting or hardfork to occur
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Android asset aware wallet?
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Is in beta right
Tron05/10/2019
Testing went well today on Android. Nearing release.
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
as it is a mechanism that is wallet specific
liqdmetal05/10/2019
no protocol level dividends you guys are saying?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
correct
Tron05/10/2019
DM me if you want to test Android with Asset support. I'll send you the .APK.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
RVN gonna be on tZero wallet? :yum:
liqdmetal05/10/2019
why not? what is the logic on non-protocol dividends
assets + protocol dividends is nirvana
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
dividends is pretty much sending payments to addresses. Right now, you would have to do this manually. The dividends code, will allow this to be done quicker and easier.
No consensus changes are required.
Tron05/10/2019
New Android wallet is BIP44 and original Android wallet is BIP32/BIP39 so the words will not find the funds. You'll need to send them to another wallet, and then send them to new BIP44 derived address.
liqdmetal05/10/2019
we already have payments to addresses
so dividends is not a feature so much as simple wallet script
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
@[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs The dividend code changes look risky'er to me than messaging. Would you consider "tags" branch test-ready?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Not yet @Hans_Schmidt
Dividends is easier then you would think if coded correctly. I still haven't seen the code from the community developer. Excited to view it though.
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
@[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs Sorry- I meant restricted, not dividend
kryptoshi05/10/2019
@Tron on the Android wallet, anyone successfully added their own node and got it to sync faster? Always have issues. I have a supped up node and cannot get it to work with the Android wallet...
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
@Hans_Schmidt Oh, that makes more sense. Yes, they are very risky! That is why we are going to create a new bug bounty program for restricted assets testing.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Once the network does get flooded w FPGAs, should we even consider changing the algo a couple times a year? That would only give bitstream developers added time to hoard their creations for themselves
Kind of like they're already doing with their x16r bitstreams :yum:
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Flooded... lol... like that hardware has mass production scale like gpus...come on dude
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Bip44 wallet? :smiley:
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@kryptoshi Eventually yes, where there's $$$ to be made, people make things happen
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
So can we trade from that in the new Binance Dex when RVN get listed?
kryptoshi05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor Yes Soon TM lol. :soontm:
Tron05/10/2019
@kryptoshi There are some things we can do to speed it up. For a new wallet, it shouldn't need to sync. For recovered wallet, it needs to sync from beginning of BIP44 wallet support on iOS so words can be moved between the two.
Other options include grabbing the first derived address and looking it up on an explorer to see when it was first used and sync from there.
Another option is to add an optional number with the 12 words so it knows when to start syncing.
There isn't a good reason on an SPV wallet to sync before the seed was created.
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Cool. Glad you are looking at speedup options.. :right_facing_fist: :left_facing_fist:
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
@MrFanelli™ If the binance dex support RVN deposits. I am sure you would be able to send from it
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Has binance reached out for any info or anything?
I seen that we ranked in some voting competition they had on twitter
for an ama
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
I believe we'll need to create a fund of approximately $300,000 in order to get a BNB-RVN asset created and listed on the Binance FDEX
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
In order to work with binance we need Ravencoin integrated into Blockbook.
Tron05/10/2019
@MrFanelli™ I've reached back out to Binance on the AMA.
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Awesome :smile:
kryptoshi05/10/2019
@Tron you are a natural on the interviews... cool as a cucumber. :sunglasses:
Tron05/10/2019
Thanks @kryptoshi
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Cool. We are done for today.
Please don't ask us any more questions :smiley:
Tron05/10/2019
Thanks everyone!!!!
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Cya everyone!!
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Cya happy feet, Thanks
Thanks Tron
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
:bepbep:
submitted by mrderrik to Ravencoin [link] [comments]

3 Unique Free Bitcoin Cloud Mining Sites SHA-256 (Hash ... BITCOIN INSANE TRADING COMPETITION ON BYBIT!!! (WIN UP TO ... Ron Paul: Bitcoin vs. The Fed WOW!! STOCK MARKET JUNE COLLAPSE!! BITCOIN $100,000 ... 'Fake Bitcoin' - How this Woman Scammed the World, then ...

As a result the replacement, the SHA-3 family, has already been picked actually, and it's in the final stages of standardization today, but it wasn't available at the time Bitcoin was designed. This was a good choice, this was strongest general purpose cryptographic hash function available at the time. It is possible that it will become less secure over the lifetime of Bitcoin, but for now it ... The SHA-3 hash competition was an open process by which the NIST defined a new standard hash function (standard for US federal usages, but things are such that this will probably become a worldwide de facto standard). The process was initiated in 2007. At that time, a number of weaknesses and attacks had been found on the predecessors of the SHA-2 functions (SHA-256, SHA-512...), namely MD5 ... ASIC Mining Rigs have 3+ year life cycles and can only be used to mine Sha-256 Protocols (almost entirely Bitcoin). Bitcoin Mining Facilities have 5+ year life cycles and are typically ... Grøstl Algorithm is a cryptographic hash function designed in 2008 as a candidate for SHA-3 competition organized by NIST. Later in 2010 this algorithm is chosen as one of the 5 finalist that was submitted to the NIST competition. Grøstl is an iterated hash function where the compression function is built from two fixed, large, different permutations. The design of Grøstl is transparent and ... The Keccak team’s proposal won the NIST competition for SHA-3 in 2007. The name Keccak comes from Kecak, a Balinese dance. [2, 3] Similarly, please don’t call something sha3 unless you have ...

[index] [21284] [50777] [27522] [34939] [33564] [4787] [18647] [24545] [22511] [34742]

3 Unique Free Bitcoin Cloud Mining Sites SHA-256 (Hash ...

Why do blocks get confirmed every ten minutes? How is it ensured that a block is mined within ten minutes? What would happen if there are too many miners com... 3 Free Bitcoin Cloud Mining Sites SHA-256 (Hash Algorithm) Scrypt Mining 2020 Link : https://bit.ly/3h2hasj Link : https://bit.ly/331nMCq Link: https://bit.l... Onecoin promised the world, but only proved to be a trail of destruction. --- About ColdFusion --- ColdFusion is an Australian based online media company ind... WATCH LIVE DAILY: https://ivanontech.com/live 🚀 FREE CODING WEBINAR: https://coding.ivanontech.com/ ️ START TRADING (get great starter deals): https://iva... Jack Ma on the Future of Bitcoin - Duration: 3:59. Tuan Do 758,885 views. 3:59. What is Blockchain - Duration: 13:59. zlotolow 2,380,142 views. 13:59. BTC AT $1M IS CONSERVATIVE - John Mcafee ...

#